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Extinction & Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds (review)

Extinction & Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds (review) BOOK REVIEW Extinction & Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds. David Steadman. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2006. xi þ 594 pp., 108 halftones, 133 line drawings, bibliography, 1 appendix, 2 indices. cloth US $110.00; £69.50--ISBN 0-22677141-5; paperback US $45.00; £28.50 ISBN 0-226-77142-3. Reviewed by Scott M. Fitzpatrick, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, North Carolina State University I first had the opportunity to work on a tropical island as an undergraduate student in the early 1990s and quickly became fascinated with the diverse array of flora and fauna that surrounded me. Archaeologically I was just as enthralled, for it seemed to me, at least on the surface, that these islands must have been harsh places to live, yet at the same time richly abundant in resources to prehistoric settlers. I must admit that this superficial perception of island life quickly evaporated as I began researching some of the common themes in island archaeology. In the process, I encountered the growing body of evidence in the Caribbean and Pacific suggesting that humans had overexploited, or had impacted in some fashion, island environments long before the arrival of Europeans. During this initial launch into my archaeological career, more often than not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Extinction & Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 48 (1) – Aug 7, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1535-8283
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEW Extinction & Biogeography of Tropical Pacific Birds. David Steadman. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 2006. xi þ 594 pp., 108 halftones, 133 line drawings, bibliography, 1 appendix, 2 indices. cloth US $110.00; £69.50--ISBN 0-22677141-5; paperback US $45.00; £28.50 ISBN 0-226-77142-3. Reviewed by Scott M. Fitzpatrick, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, North Carolina State University I first had the opportunity to work on a tropical island as an undergraduate student in the early 1990s and quickly became fascinated with the diverse array of flora and fauna that surrounded me. Archaeologically I was just as enthralled, for it seemed to me, at least on the surface, that these islands must have been harsh places to live, yet at the same time richly abundant in resources to prehistoric settlers. I must admit that this superficial perception of island life quickly evaporated as I began researching some of the common themes in island archaeology. In the process, I encountered the growing body of evidence in the Caribbean and Pacific suggesting that humans had overexploited, or had impacted in some fashion, island environments long before the arrival of Europeans. During this initial launch into my archaeological career, more often than not

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 7, 2009

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