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Expanding the Cultivation and Practice of Love and Compassion in our Suffering World: Continuing the Dialogue between Liberation Theologians and Engaged Buddhists

Expanding the Cultivation and Practice of Love and Compassion in our Suffering World: Continuing... Karen B. Enriquez Xavier University There is a rich reservoir of work on the comparison of Christian liberation theology and socially engaged Buddhism.1 As a Christian liberation and feminist theologian, I have learned a lot from these discussions and have been challenged by critiques of how liberation theology may be inadequate: as partial and exclusionary in its option (only) for the poor and as focused heavily on social transformation without equal emphasis on personal transformation. These critiques prompted me to reflect more deeply on these aspects in liberation theology, not just as a response to these dialogues but just as importantly in order to live out of a clearer vision of the approach, intent, and deep spiritual and ethical wells out of which Christian liberation theology has arisen. This is the promise of dialogue: not just learning about the other but learning through the other about oneself even more deeply. My own perspective in liberation and feminist theologies is shaped by my formation in Jesuit education and exposure to liberation theology in Latin America and Asia, especially the Philippines, which emphasizes the importance of the communal dimension of the person as well as the spiritual dimension of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Expanding the Cultivation and Practice of Love and Compassion in our Suffering World: Continuing the Dialogue between Liberation Theologians and Engaged Buddhists

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 36 – Oct 10, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

Karen B. Enriquez Xavier University There is a rich reservoir of work on the comparison of Christian liberation theology and socially engaged Buddhism.1 As a Christian liberation and feminist theologian, I have learned a lot from these discussions and have been challenged by critiques of how liberation theology may be inadequate: as partial and exclusionary in its option (only) for the poor and as focused heavily on social transformation without equal emphasis on personal transformation. These critiques prompted me to reflect more deeply on these aspects in liberation theology, not just as a response to these dialogues but just as importantly in order to live out of a clearer vision of the approach, intent, and deep spiritual and ethical wells out of which Christian liberation theology has arisen. This is the promise of dialogue: not just learning about the other but learning through the other about oneself even more deeply. My own perspective in liberation and feminist theologies is shaped by my formation in Jesuit education and exposure to liberation theology in Latin America and Asia, especially the Philippines, which emphasizes the importance of the communal dimension of the person as well as the spiritual dimension of the

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2016

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