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Excavations at the Kipapa Rockshelter, Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i

Excavations at the Kipapa Rockshelter, Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i Test excavations of a late precontact to early contact rockshelter site in the traditional district of Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i, are discussed. The excavated cultural deposits primarily consist of three combustion features, two informal fire pits, and an earth oven. The deposit contained indigenous Hawaiian artifacts, such as basalt lithics, bone awls, and a fishhook. Fine-screening methods were employed with the use of 1/16 in. (1.59 mm) mesh, and relatively large amounts of fish bone and microfauna were also recovered. Using faunal and material culture evidence, it is argued that the rockshelter is a single component of a traditional Hawaiian household complex (kau hale), probably a cookhouse (hale kahumu). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Excavations at the Kipapa Rockshelter, Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i

Asian Perspectives , Volume 40 (2) – Jan 11, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

Test excavations of a late precontact to early contact rockshelter site in the traditional district of Kahikinui, Maui, Hawai'i, are discussed. The excavated cultural deposits primarily consist of three combustion features, two informal fire pits, and an earth oven. The deposit contained indigenous Hawaiian artifacts, such as basalt lithics, bone awls, and a fishhook. Fine-screening methods were employed with the use of 1/16 in. (1.59 mm) mesh, and relatively large amounts of fish bone and microfauna were also recovered. Using faunal and material culture evidence, it is argued that the rockshelter is a single component of a traditional Hawaiian household complex (kau hale), probably a cookhouse (hale kahumu).

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 11, 2001

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