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Etto n̄an Raan Kein: A Marshall Islands History, by Julianne M Walsh et al. (review)

Etto n̄an Raan Kein: A Marshall Islands History, by Julianne M Walsh et al. (review) the contemporary pacific · 25:2 (2013) (gmos); working to repeal legislation that criminalizes homeless people and the (De)Occupy Honolulu movement; and opposing the development of Mauna Kea as well as the latest incarnation of the state's land grab: the legislature's creation of the Public Land Development Corporation. When I place Noho Hewa on my syllabi, I think of the sleeping student, and, even more, I think about those students who, after watching this film, were inspired to wake him up and to find other ways to claim their past and their future. Not only for my students in Hawai`i but also for viewers in and beyond the Pacific, Noho Hewa serves as a wake-up call as urgent as it is beautiful. the Mind (1986) appears: The effect of the cultural bomb is to / annihilate a people's belief in their names . . . / in their heritage . . . ultimately in themselves. // It makes them see their past as one / wasteland of non-achievement and it / makes them want to distance themselves / from that wasteland. As we discussed in class, this use of white text against a black screen is anything but simple. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Etto n̄an Raan Kein: A Marshall Islands History, by Julianne M Walsh et al. (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 25 (2) – Aug 2, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 25:2 (2013) (gmos); working to repeal legislation that criminalizes homeless people and the (De)Occupy Honolulu movement; and opposing the development of Mauna Kea as well as the latest incarnation of the state's land grab: the legislature's creation of the Public Land Development Corporation. When I place Noho Hewa on my syllabi, I think of the sleeping student, and, even more, I think about those students who, after watching this film, were inspired to wake him up and to find other ways to claim their past and their future. Not only for my students in Hawai`i but also for viewers in and beyond the Pacific, Noho Hewa serves as a wake-up call as urgent as it is beautiful. the Mind (1986) appears: The effect of the cultural bomb is to / annihilate a people's belief in their names . . . / in their heritage . . . ultimately in themselves. // It makes them see their past as one / wasteland of non-achievement and it / makes them want to distance themselves / from that wasteland. As we discussed in class, this use of white text against a black screen is anything but simple.

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 2, 2013

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