Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (review)

Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (review) distraction, but the author's project might have been executed somewhat more effectively by developing more fully the Wittgensteinian discussion earlier and perhaps putting the discussion of Strauss later. Given the literature on Maimonides, the assumption that readers of the book will have some familiarity with Strauss' views and will regard them as important (whether or not they also regard them as illuminating or persuasive) is a safe one. A discussion of them is a way into Maimonides that will ``connect'' with many readers. At the same time, the main interest of the book is its treatment of Maimonides' negative theology and soteriology and the question of whether an isolate could attain salvation. This is not remote from the debates about hermeneutic approaches to Maimonides and the meta-issues that they raise, but the focus seems to shift back and forth a bit. It seemed to this reader that there is plenty to pursue concerning (a) the issue of ``salvation and the isolate,'' (b) the limits of language and the analogy between Maimonides and Wittgenstein, and (c) the relations between those two issues, to make for a new and provocative approach. Again, the debates about Strauss are not unsuited to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 58 (3) – Jul 16, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/ethics-and-the-history-of-indian-philosophy-review-CpVib8DxvW
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

distraction, but the author's project might have been executed somewhat more effectively by developing more fully the Wittgensteinian discussion earlier and perhaps putting the discussion of Strauss later. Given the literature on Maimonides, the assumption that readers of the book will have some familiarity with Strauss' views and will regard them as important (whether or not they also regard them as illuminating or persuasive) is a safe one. A discussion of them is a way into Maimonides that will ``connect'' with many readers. At the same time, the main interest of the book is its treatment of Maimonides' negative theology and soteriology and the question of whether an isolate could attain salvation. This is not remote from the debates about hermeneutic approaches to Maimonides and the meta-issues that they raise, but the focus seems to shift back and forth a bit. It seemed to this reader that there is plenty to pursue concerning (a) the issue of ``salvation and the isolate,'' (b) the limits of language and the analogy between Maimonides and Wittgenstein, and (c) the relations between those two issues, to make for a new and provocative approach. Again, the debates about Strauss are not unsuited to

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 16, 2008

There are no references for this article.