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Ergativity and Balinese Syntax (review)

Ergativity and Balinese Syntax (review) I Ketut Artawa. 1998. Ergativity and Balinese syntax (Parts 1, 2, and 3). NUSA Linguistic Studies of Indonesian and Other Languages in Indonesia, volumes 42, 43, 44. Jakarta: Badan Penyelenggara Seri NUSA. xv + 169 pp. The extent to which an ergative analysis is appropriate for western Austronesian focus system languages (such as Tagalog, Indonesian/Malay, and Balinese, among others) is for me problematic. To many its appropriateness is virtually axiomatic; to others, including myself, its use in fact often seems counterproductive. This work, published as three volumes of the Indonesian linguistics journal NUSA, is, although not explicitly identified as such, the author's 1994 Ph.D. thesis, written at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. It might have been more appropriately titled "aspects of Balinese syntax, with some reference to ergativity," as the ten chapters describe a range of syntactic structures, and ergativity is only discussed extensively in four of them. The work is basically, in the author's words, "descriptive-typological" and avoids undue formalism, although at some points a Relational Grammar approach is utilized, and there is a brief comparison with Government and Binding theory as well. The author both presents descriptions of areas of Balinese syntax, and argues for the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Ergativity and Balinese Syntax (review)

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 6, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

I Ketut Artawa. 1998. Ergativity and Balinese syntax (Parts 1, 2, and 3). NUSA Linguistic Studies of Indonesian and Other Languages in Indonesia, volumes 42, 43, 44. Jakarta: Badan Penyelenggara Seri NUSA. xv + 169 pp. The extent to which an ergative analysis is appropriate for western Austronesian focus system languages (such as Tagalog, Indonesian/Malay, and Balinese, among others) is for me problematic. To many its appropriateness is virtually axiomatic; to others, including myself, its use in fact often seems counterproductive. This work, published as three volumes of the Indonesian linguistics journal NUSA, is, although not explicitly identified as such, the author's 1994 Ph.D. thesis, written at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. It might have been more appropriately titled "aspects of Balinese syntax, with some reference to ergativity," as the ten chapters describe a range of syntactic structures, and ergativity is only discussed extensively in four of them. The work is basically, in the author's words, "descriptive-typological" and avoids undue formalism, although at some points a Relational Grammar approach is utilized, and there is a brief comparison with Government and Binding theory as well. The author both presents descriptions of areas of Balinese syntax, and argues for the

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2000

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