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Epistemologies and the Limitations of Philosophical Enquiry: Doctrine in Madhva Vedanta (review)

Epistemologies and the Limitations of Philosophical Enquiry: Doctrine in Madhva Vedanta (review) itive awareness supervenes, akin to poetic insight. As Heine more colloquially expresses it in the title of chapter 5, it is ``Seeing the Forest, but Not Missing the Trees.'' He goes on to show how one can employ this adage to resolve conflicts, to settle crises, to turn defeat to one's advantage, and to develop powers of diplomacy. Throughout this book, Heine balances recondite allusions to Eastern philosophy with frequent references to sports, jazz, films, and Bob Dylan lyrics. Though it is difficult to make this work, Heine does. Especially persuasive is Heine's portrayal of Phil Jackson, the legendary professional basketball coach. Jackson, combining the best of the Hermit and the Warrior, has a mental agility that allows him to create complex strategies and to coax cooperation out of incongruent and difficult personalities. Philosophers in the Western tradition may find it interesting to see how the concerns of Zen address their own concerns, albeit in a different idiom. Even if one disagrees with the tenets of Zen Buddhism about, say, the subversive quality of all emotions, the futility of desire, or the inconsistency of reality, it is hard to disagree that Zen has tremendous adaptive value in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Epistemologies and the Limitations of Philosophical Enquiry: Doctrine in Madhva Vedanta (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 57 (1) – Jan 25, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

itive awareness supervenes, akin to poetic insight. As Heine more colloquially expresses it in the title of chapter 5, it is ``Seeing the Forest, but Not Missing the Trees.'' He goes on to show how one can employ this adage to resolve conflicts, to settle crises, to turn defeat to one's advantage, and to develop powers of diplomacy. Throughout this book, Heine balances recondite allusions to Eastern philosophy with frequent references to sports, jazz, films, and Bob Dylan lyrics. Though it is difficult to make this work, Heine does. Especially persuasive is Heine's portrayal of Phil Jackson, the legendary professional basketball coach. Jackson, combining the best of the Hermit and the Warrior, has a mental agility that allows him to create complex strategies and to coax cooperation out of incongruent and difficult personalities. Philosophers in the Western tradition may find it interesting to see how the concerns of Zen address their own concerns, albeit in a different idiom. Even if one disagrees with the tenets of Zen Buddhism about, say, the subversive quality of all emotions, the futility of desire, or the inconsistency of reality, it is hard to disagree that Zen has tremendous adaptive value in the

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 25, 2007

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