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Endnote—Sojourns Across Sources: Unbraiding Sino-Cambodian Histories

Endnote—Sojourns Across Sources: Unbraiding Sino-Cambodian Histories PENNY EDWARDS University of California, Berkeley There was a hiatus that could not be called silence because while they did not speak there was passing between them the vivid dialogue of the unexpressed. -- NADINE GORDIMER (2007, 101) History is not the sort of animal you can domesticate. -- (2011, 89) Late one evening in March 1886, a court official named A Gi was stabbed to death in the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh, the capital of the French protectorate of Cambodia. A Gi was the head of the Hainanese Association in Cambodia. He had recently rallied to the French protectorate, gaining the colonial government's confidence through regular meetings and falling from the favor of Cambodian king Norodom I in the process. His murder chilled Francophile dignitaries across the capital. "The mandarins are terrified," wrote France's representative in Cambodia, Lieutenant-Colonel Badens: "They say that those who have taken France's part will meet the same fate" (Badens 1886, 2). Rumors were rife. Was this a revenge killing? A Gi had apparently refused his daughter to both King Norodom and Prince Duong Chakr. Was it the political assassination of a turncoat? A Gi was known as a collaborator with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

Endnote—Sojourns Across Sources: Unbraiding Sino-Cambodian Histories

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
Publisher site
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Abstract

PENNY EDWARDS University of California, Berkeley There was a hiatus that could not be called silence because while they did not speak there was passing between them the vivid dialogue of the unexpressed. -- NADINE GORDIMER (2007, 101) History is not the sort of animal you can domesticate. -- (2011, 89) Late one evening in March 1886, a court official named A Gi was stabbed to death in the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh, the capital of the French protectorate of Cambodia. A Gi was the head of the Hainanese Association in Cambodia. He had recently rallied to the French protectorate, gaining the colonial government's confidence through regular meetings and falling from the favor of Cambodian king Norodom I in the process. His murder chilled Francophile dignitaries across the capital. "The mandarins are terrified," wrote France's representative in Cambodia, Lieutenant-Colonel Badens: "They say that those who have taken France's part will meet the same fate" (Badens 1886, 2). Rumors were rife. Was this a revenge killing? A Gi had apparently refused his daughter to both King Norodom and Prince Duong Chakr. Was it the political assassination of a turncoat? A Gi was known as a collaborator with the

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 30, 2012

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