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Empires and Barbarians: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe by Peter Heather (review)

Empires and Barbarians: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe by Peter Heather (review) at last be finding a formal foothold in the academe outside of the world history and big history communities. The collection of practical offerings made by Shryock and Smail in Deep History is, in this sense, truly revolutionary in its own right. richard blundell Macquarie University Empires and Barbarians: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe. By peter heather. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. 752 pp. $34.95 (cloth); $24.95 (paper). When Peter Heather's The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History appeared in 2005, a natural choice for reviewers was to cover it jointly with Bryan Ward-Perkins's The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilization, published by Oxford the same year. For one reviewer, the two represented a "counter-reformation" in studies of what used to be called Rome's "decline and fall." So, the "reformers" would be those many scholars who now view the late Roman­early Medieval as a world of new beginnings rather than a time of death and destruction. For the counter-reformers, the years leading up to 500 c.e. saw true decline, and the widely pooh-poohed "end of the Western empire" in 476 had a more than symbolic significance. Now, in Empires http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Empires and Barbarians: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe by Peter Heather (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (4) – May 24, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

at last be finding a formal foothold in the academe outside of the world history and big history communities. The collection of practical offerings made by Shryock and Smail in Deep History is, in this sense, truly revolutionary in its own right. richard blundell Macquarie University Empires and Barbarians: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe. By peter heather. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. 752 pp. $34.95 (cloth); $24.95 (paper). When Peter Heather's The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History appeared in 2005, a natural choice for reviewers was to cover it jointly with Bryan Ward-Perkins's The Fall of Rome and the End of Civilization, published by Oxford the same year. For one reviewer, the two represented a "counter-reformation" in studies of what used to be called Rome's "decline and fall." So, the "reformers" would be those many scholars who now view the late Roman­early Medieval as a world of new beginnings rather than a time of death and destruction. For the counter-reformers, the years leading up to 500 c.e. saw true decline, and the widely pooh-poohed "end of the Western empire" in 476 had a more than symbolic significance. Now, in Empires

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 24, 2012

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