Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Egypt: A Short History (review)

Egypt: A Short History (review) Book Reviews Parsons's concluding chapter targets neoconservatives and America's inclination to employ "imperial methods" in its foreign policy. By this he means the combination of so-called soft power that can be backed up by hard military power when deemed necessary. This seems to be identical to John Gallagher and Ronald Robinson's use of "informal empire" to describe nineteenth-century Britain's relations with countries in Latin America and elsewhere (see their "The Imperialism of Free Trade," in The Economic History Review 6, no. 1, 1953). Parsons acknowledges that the United States is not a formal empire, so America's presence in the book is anomalous, leading one to conclude that the preceding case studies were meant to sound a cautionary note for those who wax nostalgic about erstwhile empires and think the United States should emulate them. Indeed, Parsons's general lack of engagement with other scholarly and theoretical works suggests that his goal is to influence the broader reading public and policy-makers, rather than the academic community. What does Parsons propose as an alternative to empire? Nationstates allowed (often forced) the mass of "lower orders" to become "full and equal members" of society and so were a step forward in our http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Egypt: A Short History (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (2) – Aug 9, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/egypt-a-short-history-review-stsZ0ucaz1
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews Parsons's concluding chapter targets neoconservatives and America's inclination to employ "imperial methods" in its foreign policy. By this he means the combination of so-called soft power that can be backed up by hard military power when deemed necessary. This seems to be identical to John Gallagher and Ronald Robinson's use of "informal empire" to describe nineteenth-century Britain's relations with countries in Latin America and elsewhere (see their "The Imperialism of Free Trade," in The Economic History Review 6, no. 1, 1953). Parsons acknowledges that the United States is not a formal empire, so America's presence in the book is anomalous, leading one to conclude that the preceding case studies were meant to sound a cautionary note for those who wax nostalgic about erstwhile empires and think the United States should emulate them. Indeed, Parsons's general lack of engagement with other scholarly and theoretical works suggests that his goal is to influence the broader reading public and policy-makers, rather than the academic community. What does Parsons propose as an alternative to empire? Nationstates allowed (often forced) the mass of "lower orders" to become "full and equal members" of society and so were a step forward in our

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 9, 2012

There are no references for this article.