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Editors’ Introduction

Editors’ Introduction One of the issues with which I have struggled in interfaith work and within Buddhist-Christian studies over the years is the common, but often unspoken, practice of engaging the dialogue from a position of recognizing strengths in the other tradition. I am occasionally invited to speak at Mother's Trust/Mother's Place, an interfaith community in western Michigan. It is a vibrant intentional community, rooted in an offshoot of the Vivekananda tradition and located about an hour's drive from Kalamazoo, where I teach. They offer courses on interfaith work and have an active and varied list of speakers throughout the year, ranging from indigenous native traditions of Michigan to Buddhist, Sufi, Hindu--and, of course, Christian. The resident members of this community are grounded in the meditation practices of the Ramakrishna lineage but wrestle with the very real challenges of how to live a life of integrity that honors and respects the truths of all faith traditions. When I have spoken at services on Sunday morning, I speak out of the Pli tradition, the Buddhist tradition with which I have identified, studied, and argued for the better part of three decades. The first talks that I gave in the late 1990s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Editors’ Introduction

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 36 – Oct 10, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

One of the issues with which I have struggled in interfaith work and within Buddhist-Christian studies over the years is the common, but often unspoken, practice of engaging the dialogue from a position of recognizing strengths in the other tradition. I am occasionally invited to speak at Mother's Trust/Mother's Place, an interfaith community in western Michigan. It is a vibrant intentional community, rooted in an offshoot of the Vivekananda tradition and located about an hour's drive from Kalamazoo, where I teach. They offer courses on interfaith work and have an active and varied list of speakers throughout the year, ranging from indigenous native traditions of Michigan to Buddhist, Sufi, Hindu--and, of course, Christian. The resident members of this community are grounded in the meditation practices of the Ramakrishna lineage but wrestle with the very real challenges of how to live a life of integrity that honors and respects the truths of all faith traditions. When I have spoken at services on Sunday morning, I speak out of the Pli tradition, the Buddhist tradition with which I have identified, studied, and argued for the better part of three decades. The first talks that I gave in the late 1990s

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2016

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