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Editorial

Editorial As the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS) moves toward its twenty-fifth year of existence, the question of identity looms. Two specific issues seem especially pertinent. The first has to do with participation. Who should be involved in SBCS dialogues? The founding vision was to include all Christians and Buddhists, men and women, professional and lay, theorists and practitioners. Some religious dialogue groups have chosen to focus either on discussions of theoretical topics or on actions aimed at redressing social problems. The SBCS has instead chosen to include both. In addition, meditative virtuosos from both traditions have been welcome, and have influenced our group to a significant degree, especially in our national and international meetings. The breadth of this vision has served us well--as an ideal at least. This stated openness has not always resulted in as broad a participation as we desired. Active leadership in the Society has tended to come from Western academics, former Christians who have become Buddhists, and Christians who see unusual value in the literary teachings of Buddhism. The intention, however, has been actualized to some degree and, as important, has influenced the open character of the dialogue. And, as we will discuss in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

As the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS) moves toward its twenty-fifth year of existence, the question of identity looms. Two specific issues seem especially pertinent. The first has to do with participation. Who should be involved in SBCS dialogues? The founding vision was to include all Christians and Buddhists, men and women, professional and lay, theorists and practitioners. Some religious dialogue groups have chosen to focus either on discussions of theoretical topics or on actions aimed at redressing social problems. The SBCS has instead chosen to include both. In addition, meditative virtuosos from both traditions have been welcome, and have influenced our group to a significant degree, especially in our national and international meetings. The breadth of this vision has served us well--as an ideal at least. This stated openness has not always resulted in as broad a participation as we desired. Active leadership in the Society has tended to come from Western academics, former Christians who have become Buddhists, and Christians who see unusual value in the literary teachings of Buddhism. The intention, however, has been actualized to some degree and, as important, has influenced the open character of the dialogue. And, as we will discuss in

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 29, 2003

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