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Editor's Note

Editor's Note Welcome to the third volume of Azalea. Our readers will find the fine translations of contemporary literary works you have come to expect in our project, and the artwork as well, in Kim Atta's resonant photographic compositions. Three features of the current issue seem especially noteworthy. After some years, the novelist Haïlji's writing has now come to be more broadly recognized as part of a world literature that Korean writing has hopes of engaging. His observations regarding the initially hostile reception of his work bring an important figure, the reader, and especially the contemporary Korean literary critic, back into view as part of the defining matrix in which Korean writing is situated. Peter Lee makes the p'ansori narrative Ch'unhyang an equal participant in the contemporary world of Korean literature by reminding us again of the work's performance dimensions, while showing us that characteristic, performative aspect of all premodern Korean poetry as song. His point takes on a particular resonance when we note Haïlji's comments about Korean literary influences on his work, where he acknowledges the Korean folksong poet Kim Sowl's major impact. And Ch'unhyang's likeness on the covers of kososl (old novels) published early in Korean literature's modern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture University of Hawai'I Press

Editor's Note

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture , Volume 3 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1944-6500
Publisher site
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Abstract

Welcome to the third volume of Azalea. Our readers will find the fine translations of contemporary literary works you have come to expect in our project, and the artwork as well, in Kim Atta's resonant photographic compositions. Three features of the current issue seem especially noteworthy. After some years, the novelist Haïlji's writing has now come to be more broadly recognized as part of a world literature that Korean writing has hopes of engaging. His observations regarding the initially hostile reception of his work bring an important figure, the reader, and especially the contemporary Korean literary critic, back into view as part of the defining matrix in which Korean writing is situated. Peter Lee makes the p'ansori narrative Ch'unhyang an equal participant in the contemporary world of Korean literature by reminding us again of the work's performance dimensions, while showing us that characteristic, performative aspect of all premodern Korean poetry as song. His point takes on a particular resonance when we note Haïlji's comments about Korean literary influences on his work, where he acknowledges the Korean folksong poet Kim Sowl's major impact. And Ch'unhyang's likeness on the covers of kososl (old novels) published early in Korean literature's modern

Journal

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & CultureUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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