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Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note Approaching the island of Moloka`i from the west, the traveler comes upon a wide, low strand--the longest white sand beach in the Hawaiian Archipelago--rising gradually onto a scrubby, desiccated plain. This is the blunt, leeward end of the narrow island--ten miles wide by thirty-eight miles long--lying east and west by the compass. The Päpöhaku Beach on the west end is poorly vegetated, with low hills and shifting sand dunes. Moisture riding the easterly trade winds creates rain clouds and drenches the fivethousand-foot-high mountains in the windward and middle parts of the island, soaking the deep valleys and feeding abundant waterfalls. However, little moisture reaches the dry leeward soil. Along the northeast coast, the traveler will encounter twelve miles of breathtaking fluted cliffs, the highest plunging more than 3,500 feet into the sea. A flat, rocky peninsula--shaped like the head of a shark--juts out from the island at the base of this line of cliffs. Its name is Makanalua, though it is commonly called Kalaupapa, which is also the name of a village on the western side of the peninsula. Few places in the Hawaiian Archipelago seem as isolated and desolate as this volcanic headland. Robert Louis Stevenson described http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Editor’s Note

Manoa , Volume 23 (2) – Mar 16, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
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Abstract

Approaching the island of Moloka`i from the west, the traveler comes upon a wide, low strand--the longest white sand beach in the Hawaiian Archipelago--rising gradually onto a scrubby, desiccated plain. This is the blunt, leeward end of the narrow island--ten miles wide by thirty-eight miles long--lying east and west by the compass. The Päpöhaku Beach on the west end is poorly vegetated, with low hills and shifting sand dunes. Moisture riding the easterly trade winds creates rain clouds and drenches the fivethousand-foot-high mountains in the windward and middle parts of the island, soaking the deep valleys and feeding abundant waterfalls. However, little moisture reaches the dry leeward soil. Along the northeast coast, the traveler will encounter twelve miles of breathtaking fluted cliffs, the highest plunging more than 3,500 feet into the sea. A flat, rocky peninsula--shaped like the head of a shark--juts out from the island at the base of this line of cliffs. Its name is Makanalua, though it is commonly called Kalaupapa, which is also the name of a village on the western side of the peninsula. Few places in the Hawaiian Archipelago seem as isolated and desolate as this volcanic headland. Robert Louis Stevenson described

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 16, 2011

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