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Editor's Note

Editor's Note t is a great privilege to follow in the footsteps of the four previous editors of The Contemporary Pacific, and a pleasure to note that two of these distinguished individuals have articles in this issue. Founding editor Brij V Lal's poignant contribution calls attention to the human costs of political instability in Fiji over the last two decades, the approximate life span of the journal. Lal underlines the fundamental importance of the regional issues we seek to understand and represent through scholarly analysis, dialogue essays, artwork, annual political reviews, as well as book and media reviews. David Hanlon's essay, on the other hand, reminds us of the work remaining to be done. As he points out, Micronesia has not been particularly well represented in the broader field of Pacific studies, or in the pages of this journal. Hanlon, who served as editor after Lal, calls for regional studies that are inclusive, critical, and comparative; that counter colonial representations; and that open space for local voices, perspectives, and epistemologies. This matches well the goals and aspirations that will guide my work as editor. The continuing relevance of more than forty issues of the journal is apparent in Pacific-related references http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

t is a great privilege to follow in the footsteps of the four previous editors of The Contemporary Pacific, and a pleasure to note that two of these distinguished individuals have articles in this issue. Founding editor Brij V Lal's poignant contribution calls attention to the human costs of political instability in Fiji over the last two decades, the approximate life span of the journal. Lal underlines the fundamental importance of the regional issues we seek to understand and represent through scholarly analysis, dialogue essays, artwork, annual political reviews, as well as book and media reviews. David Hanlon's essay, on the other hand, reminds us of the work remaining to be done. As he points out, Micronesia has not been particularly well represented in the broader field of Pacific studies, or in the pages of this journal. Hanlon, who served as editor after Lal, calls for regional studies that are inclusive, critical, and comparative; that counter colonial representations; and that open space for local voices, perspectives, and epistemologies. This matches well the goals and aspirations that will guide my work as editor. The continuing relevance of more than forty issues of the journal is apparent in Pacific-related references

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 11, 2008

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