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Editor's Note

Editor's Note Asian Theatre Journal happily returns to its policy of publishing translations of Asian plays with this issue's Umbuik Mudo and the Magic Flute, a randai dance-drama, introduced by Kirstin Pauka, one of its translators. Professor Pauka's 1996 ATJ essay on randai introduced the form to most Western readers (she has since published a book and a CD-ROM on it), so it is only natural that this journal should publish the first English translation of a randai play. Two of the three essays that follow are also by previous contributors to ATJ, Catherine Diamond and Eric Rath. Catherine Diamond, who lives in Taipei, has become something of a roving reporter in the realms of South Asian theatre, and this time she surveys the wide-ranging and little-known theatrical pleasures of Cambodia. Eric Rath, who lives in Kansas, is a specialist in nö history, and here he investigates issues of artistic and theoretical transmission in that classical Japanese form. The West knows much about nö, much less about Cambodian theatre (Diamond's essay is only the second on the subject ever published by ATJ ), and barely anything about theatre in Nepal. One of the very few specialists laboring in that increasingly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

Asian Theatre Journal happily returns to its policy of publishing translations of Asian plays with this issue's Umbuik Mudo and the Magic Flute, a randai dance-drama, introduced by Kirstin Pauka, one of its translators. Professor Pauka's 1996 ATJ essay on randai introduced the form to most Western readers (she has since published a book and a CD-ROM on it), so it is only natural that this journal should publish the first English translation of a randai play. Two of the three essays that follow are also by previous contributors to ATJ, Catherine Diamond and Eric Rath. Catherine Diamond, who lives in Taipei, has become something of a roving reporter in the realms of South Asian theatre, and this time she surveys the wide-ranging and little-known theatrical pleasures of Cambodia. Eric Rath, who lives in Kansas, is a specialist in nö history, and here he investigates issues of artistic and theoretical transmission in that classical Japanese form. The West knows much about nö, much less about Cambodian theatre (Diamond's essay is only the second on the subject ever published by ATJ ), and barely anything about theatre in Nepal. One of the very few specialists laboring in that increasingly

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 24, 2003

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