Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note I met Jidi Majia for the first time in summer 2016 when I spoke at the Lu Xun Institute of Literature in Beijing about publishing Chinese poetry in the West. The institute is housed in a large, modern building faced with red stone. Life-size bronze statues of prominent Chinese and international poets stand under the shade trees along the path that circles the building. Inside, memorial plaques celebrating other poets hang in the main hallway. An oversize tapestry portrait of Lu Xun—one of China’s most revered twentieth-century writers— billows from the ceiling. Jidi Majia and I had lunch in a room off the hallway with several other Chinese translators, publishers, and scholars. In his late fifties, Jidi has a soft oval face and prominent eyes behind large square glasses. His shoulders are rounded, his body stout. When I was with him over the next two weeks, he dressed casually in a long-sleeve plaid shirt and trousers. Despite his status— Jidi Majia is a nationally acclaimed ethnic poet as well as a highly placed advocate for ethnic minorities throughout China—he seems unaffected and genuinely gracious. Jidi Majia is a member of the Yi ethnic minority group, one of the fifty-five http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Editor’s Note

Manoa , Volume 30 (1) – Sep 21, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/editor-s-note-21fvyz1Cpg
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

I met Jidi Majia for the first time in summer 2016 when I spoke at the Lu Xun Institute of Literature in Beijing about publishing Chinese poetry in the West. The institute is housed in a large, modern building faced with red stone. Life-size bronze statues of prominent Chinese and international poets stand under the shade trees along the path that circles the building. Inside, memorial plaques celebrating other poets hang in the main hallway. An oversize tapestry portrait of Lu Xun—one of China’s most revered twentieth-century writers— billows from the ceiling. Jidi Majia and I had lunch in a room off the hallway with several other Chinese translators, publishers, and scholars. In his late fifties, Jidi has a soft oval face and prominent eyes behind large square glasses. His shoulders are rounded, his body stout. When I was with him over the next two weeks, he dressed casually in a long-sleeve plaid shirt and trousers. Despite his status— Jidi Majia is a nationally acclaimed ethnic poet as well as a highly placed advocate for ethnic minorities throughout China—he seems unaffected and genuinely gracious. Jidi Majia is a member of the Yi ethnic minority group, one of the fifty-five

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 21, 2018

There are no references for this article.