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Early Buddhism and Incommensurability

Early Buddhism and Incommensurability perception; absence does not appear. Sextus, in Against the Logicians, speaks about naturally non-evident things, including the soul, which are “everlastingly hidden away.” We may not perceive absence, but that does not preclude a non-perceptual awareness of it, whatever that might be. Christopher I. Beckwith Department of Central Eurasian Studies, School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University beckwith@indiana.edu Charles Goodman (henceforth G)’s Response to the thoughtful paper by Adrian Kuzminski (“Early Buddhism Reconsidered”) in this volume is actually devoted mainly to my book Greek Buddha (2015). Half a century ago, Thomas Kuhn famously coined the term incommensurability to refer to the inability or unwillingness of many scholars in a given field to understand substantially new (“revolutionary”) work. He describes their reactions against it and their attempts to suppress or discredit it. The reason for their response is that new discoveries advance science by challenging and displacing old beliefs and practices. Kuhn accurately describes G’s Response. When I wrote Greek Buddha, I assumed that the potential readership would be people interested in a major topic of intellectual history that has been neglected for a long time, people who are able and willing to think about an alternative to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Early Buddhism and Incommensurability

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (3) – Aug 8, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

perception; absence does not appear. Sextus, in Against the Logicians, speaks about naturally non-evident things, including the soul, which are “everlastingly hidden away.” We may not perceive absence, but that does not preclude a non-perceptual awareness of it, whatever that might be. Christopher I. Beckwith Department of Central Eurasian Studies, School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University beckwith@indiana.edu Charles Goodman (henceforth G)’s Response to the thoughtful paper by Adrian Kuzminski (“Early Buddhism Reconsidered”) in this volume is actually devoted mainly to my book Greek Buddha (2015). Half a century ago, Thomas Kuhn famously coined the term incommensurability to refer to the inability or unwillingness of many scholars in a given field to understand substantially new (“revolutionary”) work. He describes their reactions against it and their attempts to suppress or discredit it. The reason for their response is that new discoveries advance science by challenging and displacing old beliefs and practices. Kuhn accurately describes G’s Response. When I wrote Greek Buddha, I assumed that the potential readership would be people interested in a major topic of intellectual history that has been neglected for a long time, people who are able and willing to think about an alternative to the

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 8, 2018

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