Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Drugs, Labor, and Colonial Expansion (review)

Drugs, Labor, and Colonial Expansion (review) Book Reviews likens the learning processes beachcombers engaged in to historical research, suggesting to historians, "we need to be beachcombers to the past" (p. 329). The last of the three sets of historical actors is the author himself. Dening creates subchapters in which he describes his own crossings, beginning with his early academic and spiritual development as a theology student and Jesuit priest, receiving his earliest ethnographic training from the Spiritual Exercises of Loyola. His next crossing brings him into Pacific research, and Dening takes time to pay tribute to the mentors, friends, archivists, and allies who taught him the nature of historical process. He recollects particularly pivotal moments in various archives, moments during which he learned the profound lesson that "Anyone engaged in cross-cultural research will know that it is not the mountains of texts of the encounter between indigenous peoples and intruding strangers that are the problem. It is the depth of the silences" (p. 169). To conclude this volume, Dening salutes the Te Enata and writes epitaphs for the beachcombers. Finally, he must pen his own exit, and thus he writes, "I must say `goodbye' to so much that has given me pleasure through fifty http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Drugs, Labor, and Colonial Expansion (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 16 (4)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/drugs-labor-and-colonial-expansion-review-3hsMEPxH29
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews likens the learning processes beachcombers engaged in to historical research, suggesting to historians, "we need to be beachcombers to the past" (p. 329). The last of the three sets of historical actors is the author himself. Dening creates subchapters in which he describes his own crossings, beginning with his early academic and spiritual development as a theology student and Jesuit priest, receiving his earliest ethnographic training from the Spiritual Exercises of Loyola. His next crossing brings him into Pacific research, and Dening takes time to pay tribute to the mentors, friends, archivists, and allies who taught him the nature of historical process. He recollects particularly pivotal moments in various archives, moments during which he learned the profound lesson that "Anyone engaged in cross-cultural research will know that it is not the mountains of texts of the encounter between indigenous peoples and intruding strangers that are the problem. It is the depth of the silences" (p. 169). To conclude this volume, Dening salutes the Te Enata and writes epitaphs for the beachcombers. Finally, he must pen his own exit, and thus he writes, "I must say `goodbye' to so much that has given me pleasure through fifty

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

There are no references for this article.