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Dreaming Me: An African American Woman's Spiritual Journey (review)

Dreaming Me: An African American Woman's Spiritual Journey (review) BOOK REVIEWS world in which many traditions and many religions live side-by-side. The only concrete choices are dialogue and mutual learning, or sectarianism and studied isolation. Buddhist Theology is indeed a book both critical and contemporary. It is essential reading for anyone engaged in Buddhist Studies Buddhist-Christian dialogue, or just theology, in any of its incarnations. John P. Keenan Middlebury College DREAMING ME: AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN'S SPIRITUAL JOURNEY. By Jan Willis. New York: Riverhead Books, 2001. 321 pp. This book invites comparison with Diana Eck's Encountering God: A Spiritual Journey from Bozeman to Banaras (Boston: Beacon Press, 1993). Both are by prominent women scholars, both have "spiritual journey" in the subtitle, and both are about Christians who come to terms with a non-Christian religion--Hinduism in Eck's case, Buddhism in Willis's case. But as soon as one gets past the titles, it is the differences that strike one. Where Eck maintains an Olympian poise, hobnobbing with Hindus but remaining a Christian and an objective scholar, interpreting and analyzing as she goes, Willis plunges into Buddhism without rejecting her family's Baptist tradition, becoming a fully participant observer so as to ask how her own history and the history of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Dreaming Me: An African American Woman's Spiritual Journey (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 22 (1) – Nov 8, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS world in which many traditions and many religions live side-by-side. The only concrete choices are dialogue and mutual learning, or sectarianism and studied isolation. Buddhist Theology is indeed a book both critical and contemporary. It is essential reading for anyone engaged in Buddhist Studies Buddhist-Christian dialogue, or just theology, in any of its incarnations. John P. Keenan Middlebury College DREAMING ME: AN AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN'S SPIRITUAL JOURNEY. By Jan Willis. New York: Riverhead Books, 2001. 321 pp. This book invites comparison with Diana Eck's Encountering God: A Spiritual Journey from Bozeman to Banaras (Boston: Beacon Press, 1993). Both are by prominent women scholars, both have "spiritual journey" in the subtitle, and both are about Christians who come to terms with a non-Christian religion--Hinduism in Eck's case, Buddhism in Willis's case. But as soon as one gets past the titles, it is the differences that strike one. Where Eck maintains an Olympian poise, hobnobbing with Hindus but remaining a Christian and an objective scholar, interpreting and analyzing as she goes, Willis plunges into Buddhism without rejecting her family's Baptist tradition, becoming a fully participant observer so as to ask how her own history and the history of

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 8, 2002

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