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Dreadlocks: In Oceania (review)

Dreadlocks: In Oceania (review) 09-CP 12-1 (br pp.256-293) 2/21/00 8:27 AM Page 289 book reviews 289 from the Sepik region. Among the questions Gillian put to each of these writers was: “What are your views about English as a medium of expres- sion?” William Takaku described the loss of linguistic diversity in Papua New Guinea as a tragedy. He argued that while the use of English was clearly only going to increase, it was also going to destroy the country’s literary potential in the process. “The expres- sions [of our mother tongues] are much more . . . ,” he said, obviously searching for a word. “In English they will come out inside-out or back-to- front, they won’t make sense.” Then there was the problem of audience. Takaku described his audience as being in the villages. “So how can I use English?” he asked. John Kasaipwalova, on the other hand, had this to say: “It’s exciting. I would put it this way—it’s a tool. Our own traditional languages are Dreadlocks: In Oceania, volume 1, beautiful tools, but they’re stone axes. 1997, edited by Sudesh Mishra and Suddenly you’re given a tool that is a Elizabeth Guy. Suva: Department of bulldozer. . . . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Dreadlocks: In Oceania (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 12 (1) – Feb 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

09-CP 12-1 (br pp.256-293) 2/21/00 8:27 AM Page 289 book reviews 289 from the Sepik region. Among the questions Gillian put to each of these writers was: “What are your views about English as a medium of expres- sion?” William Takaku described the loss of linguistic diversity in Papua New Guinea as a tragedy. He argued that while the use of English was clearly only going to increase, it was also going to destroy the country’s literary potential in the process. “The expres- sions [of our mother tongues] are much more . . . ,” he said, obviously searching for a word. “In English they will come out inside-out or back-to- front, they won’t make sense.” Then there was the problem of audience. Takaku described his audience as being in the villages. “So how can I use English?” he asked. John Kasaipwalova, on the other hand, had this to say: “It’s exciting. I would put it this way—it’s a tool. Our own traditional languages are Dreadlocks: In Oceania, volume 1, beautiful tools, but they’re stone axes. 1997, edited by Sudesh Mishra and Suddenly you’re given a tool that is a Elizabeth Guy. Suva: Department of bulldozer. . . .

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 1, 2001

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