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Dr. Johnson's Women (review)

Dr. Johnson's Women (review) 09-reviews 3/12/03 9:25 AM Page 160 160 Biography 26.1 (Winter 2003) itself, as well as the images of Harding, Brown, Lolita, and the rest that we have nearly all received through standardized education—“renditions of reality” (60)—is an opportunity well seized. More importantly, society, to a great extent shaped by the reputations of its leaders and its villains, can use this important reminder that what remains of a reputation is always the product of interests and effort. Théo Garneau Norma Clarke. Dr. Johnson’s Women. New York: Hambledon and London, 2000. 260 pp. + index, bibliography, and illustrations. ISBN 1-85285- 254-2, $24.95. Dr. Johnson’s Women is aimed at a broad audience interested in the eighteenth- century British literary world, and especially in women writers of that period. Norma Clarke’s preface clearly announces her purpose and approach. She terms the book “an attempt at collective biography which is also, in part, col- lective criticism.” Her stated goal is to explore “the conditions of female authorship at a particular time, the mid eighteenth century, and in a partic- ular place, England, meaning mostly London” (ix). The opening chapter (“At Mrs Garrick’s”) focuses on Samuel Johnson, and each of the succeeding chapters is centered http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Dr. Johnson's Women (review)

Biography , Volume 26 (1) – May 15, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

09-reviews 3/12/03 9:25 AM Page 160 160 Biography 26.1 (Winter 2003) itself, as well as the images of Harding, Brown, Lolita, and the rest that we have nearly all received through standardized education—“renditions of reality” (60)—is an opportunity well seized. More importantly, society, to a great extent shaped by the reputations of its leaders and its villains, can use this important reminder that what remains of a reputation is always the product of interests and effort. Théo Garneau Norma Clarke. Dr. Johnson’s Women. New York: Hambledon and London, 2000. 260 pp. + index, bibliography, and illustrations. ISBN 1-85285- 254-2, $24.95. Dr. Johnson’s Women is aimed at a broad audience interested in the eighteenth- century British literary world, and especially in women writers of that period. Norma Clarke’s preface clearly announces her purpose and approach. She terms the book “an attempt at collective biography which is also, in part, col- lective criticism.” Her stated goal is to explore “the conditions of female authorship at a particular time, the mid eighteenth century, and in a partic- ular place, England, meaning mostly London” (ix). The opening chapter (“At Mrs Garrick’s”) focuses on Samuel Johnson, and each of the succeeding chapters is centered

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 15, 2003

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