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Double Vision: Art Histories and Colonial Histories in the Pacific (review)

Double Vision: Art Histories and Colonial Histories in the Pacific (review) 290 the contemporary pacific sp r ing 2001 and art history. With the exception of two of the book’s essays, one by Bro n- wen Douglas and the other by Dianne Losche, the methodology of each chapter remains firmly within the mainstream of its own discipline, and perhaps this is why the essays do not meld into a coherent whole. Smith’s European Vision and the South Pacific (1960), which the editors seek to emulate and even transcend, pro- duced a remarkable summation of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century material on and about the Pacific— and some groundbreaking discussion of Australian colonial painting. But most of what is presented here is diffi- cult to compare with Smith’s book in terms of either representing and refor- mulating the past or setting agend a s and mapping a field for the future . This said, the best chapters of the book are very good indeed. D o u b le Vi s i o n:A rt Histories andC o l o- I have not read a more stimulating nial Histories in the Pacific, edited by essay of its kind than Leonard Bell’s Nicholas Thomas and Diane Losche. “Looking at Goldie: Face to Face Cambridge: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Double Vision: Art Histories and Colonial Histories in the Pacific (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 13 (1) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

290 the contemporary pacific sp r ing 2001 and art history. With the exception of two of the book’s essays, one by Bro n- wen Douglas and the other by Dianne Losche, the methodology of each chapter remains firmly within the mainstream of its own discipline, and perhaps this is why the essays do not meld into a coherent whole. Smith’s European Vision and the South Pacific (1960), which the editors seek to emulate and even transcend, pro- duced a remarkable summation of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century material on and about the Pacific— and some groundbreaking discussion of Australian colonial painting. But most of what is presented here is diffi- cult to compare with Smith’s book in terms of either representing and refor- mulating the past or setting agend a s and mapping a field for the future . This said, the best chapters of the book are very good indeed. D o u b le Vi s i o n:A rt Histories andC o l o- I have not read a more stimulating nial Histories in the Pacific, edited by essay of its kind than Leonard Bell’s Nicholas Thomas and Diane Losche. “Looking at Goldie: Face to Face Cambridge:

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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