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Dorei (Slave): A Play by Tamura Toshiko

Dorei (Slave): A Play by Tamura Toshiko play Introduction and translation by Anne Sokolsky and Tim Yamamura Tamura Toshiko (1884 ­1945) is considered by most Japanese literary scholars to be the main representative of the Japanese New Woman writer of the late Meiji (1868 ­1912) and Taish (1912­1926) eras. She is best known for her graphic depictions of female sexuality and the modern woman's struggle for personal and economic independence at a time when "good women" educated under the conservative ideology of rysai kenbo (good wife, wise mother) did not discuss such things. Writing was the sole means of Tamura's economic sustenance. Unlike many of her female writing peers, Tamura did not come from a wealthy family and she did not have a steady husband or father upon whom she could rely to support her. Tamura wrote to pay her bills. The consequence of this is that she wrote a lot. Some of her material has been judged to be quite good and other works have been deemed by scholars to be too pedantic or of questionable literary merit. Tamura wrote in all genres: fiction (for which she is best known), poetry, essays, and even two plays. Tamura wrote from the time she was nineteen http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Dorei (Slave): A Play by Tamura Toshiko

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 27 (2) – Jan 26, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-2109
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Abstract

play Introduction and translation by Anne Sokolsky and Tim Yamamura Tamura Toshiko (1884 ­1945) is considered by most Japanese literary scholars to be the main representative of the Japanese New Woman writer of the late Meiji (1868 ­1912) and Taish (1912­1926) eras. She is best known for her graphic depictions of female sexuality and the modern woman's struggle for personal and economic independence at a time when "good women" educated under the conservative ideology of rysai kenbo (good wife, wise mother) did not discuss such things. Writing was the sole means of Tamura's economic sustenance. Unlike many of her female writing peers, Tamura did not come from a wealthy family and she did not have a steady husband or father upon whom she could rely to support her. Tamura wrote to pay her bills. The consequence of this is that she wrote a lot. Some of her material has been judged to be quite good and other works have been deemed by scholars to be too pedantic or of questionable literary merit. Tamura wrote in all genres: fiction (for which she is best known), poetry, essays, and even two plays. Tamura wrote from the time she was nineteen

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 26, 2010

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