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Disease and Empire: The Health of European Troops in the Conquest of Africa (review)

Disease and Empire: The Health of European Troops in the Conquest of Africa (review) journal of world history, spring 2000 Disease and Empire: The Health of European Troops in the Conquest of Africa. By philip d. curtin. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. xii + 256. $64.95 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). Philip D. Curtin began as a historian of the British empire, of which there were many, then moved on to become a historian of Africa, of which there were few, and then, on top of that, added the awesome specialty of world history. He has sought on all these levels to learn what actually happened (an old-fashioned but durably admirable approach). I do not mean the tired stories of elites, but the story of larger categories. His Atlantic Slave Trade: A Census (Madison, Wisc.: University of Wisconsin Press, 1969) is an outstanding example of this. It has not been accepted as the final word on that subject, which is both imperfectly documented and controversial, but remains the best overall study on it and the base line from which all debates about it must begin. His new interest in the slave trade, a transnational and transcontinental subject, led Curtin to write one of my favorites among his books, The Rise and Fall http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Disease and Empire: The Health of European Troops in the Conquest of Africa (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, spring 2000 Disease and Empire: The Health of European Troops in the Conquest of Africa. By philip d. curtin. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. xii + 256. $64.95 (cloth); $19.95 (paper). Philip D. Curtin began as a historian of the British empire, of which there were many, then moved on to become a historian of Africa, of which there were few, and then, on top of that, added the awesome specialty of world history. He has sought on all these levels to learn what actually happened (an old-fashioned but durably admirable approach). I do not mean the tired stories of elites, but the story of larger categories. His Atlantic Slave Trade: A Census (Madison, Wisc.: University of Wisconsin Press, 1969) is an outstanding example of this. It has not been accepted as the final word on that subject, which is both imperfectly documented and controversial, but remains the best overall study on it and the base line from which all debates about it must begin. His new interest in the slave trade, a transnational and transcontinental subject, led Curtin to write one of my favorites among his books, The Rise and Fall

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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