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Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America (review)

Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America (review) korean studies vol. 28 · 2004 ies are largely over, their legacy will continue to play itself out. No one who studies modern Korean history can afford to neglect this valuable study of the Protestant missionary experience in Korea. Daniel C. Kane University of Hawai`i at Manoa Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America, by Diane E. Davis. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xii + 421 pp. Notes, appendixes, bibliography, index. $80.00 cloth; $29.00 paper. Diane E. Davis has a new idea about why some governments have been more successful at promoting economic growth than others. Building on the developmental state idea that disciplining of certain actors has something to do with growth, Davis adds that a regime's social bases inform whether that state can be disciplinary. Economies where states have important rural middle-class constituents experience economic growth led by the state's ability to subdue capital and labor. In short, small-farm constituents make for a disciplinary state. A comparison of four country-cases is used to make the argument. The author contrasts the experience of successful state-led development in South Korea and Taiwan with those of less success in Mexico and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 7, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

korean studies vol. 28 · 2004 ies are largely over, their legacy will continue to play itself out. No one who studies modern Korean history can afford to neglect this valuable study of the Protestant missionary experience in Korea. Daniel C. Kane University of Hawai`i at Manoa Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America, by Diane E. Davis. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2004. xii + 421 pp. Notes, appendixes, bibliography, index. $80.00 cloth; $29.00 paper. Diane E. Davis has a new idea about why some governments have been more successful at promoting economic growth than others. Building on the developmental state idea that disciplining of certain actors has something to do with growth, Davis adds that a regime's social bases inform whether that state can be disciplinary. Economies where states have important rural middle-class constituents experience economic growth led by the state's ability to subdue capital and labor. In short, small-farm constituents make for a disciplinary state. A comparison of four country-cases is used to make the argument. The author contrasts the experience of successful state-led development in South Korea and Taiwan with those of less success in Mexico and

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2004

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