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Dialogue and Liberation: What I Have Learned from My Friends—Buddhist and Christian

Dialogue and Liberation: What I Have Learned from My Friends—Buddhist and Christian Paul Knitter Union Theological Seminary My co-coordinator for this conference, Kyeongil Jung, has given me a rather daunting assignment for this lecture: within no more than forty minutes, I am supposed to (1) draw some insightful conclusions for our conference, (2) bid farewell to Union Theological Seminary as I sail off into retirement, and (3) reminisce on the past fifty years of my life. The easiest and most enjoyable of these assignments will, I suspect, be the most effective in covering them all: I'm going to focus on reminiscing. It all started for me more than fifty years ago as I stood in the Piazza San Pietro on October 11, 1962, having just arrived in Rome two weeks earlier to begin my theological studies at the Gregorian University. There, awestruck and euphoric, I watched Pope John XXIII lead some two thousand bishops into the Basilica of St. Peter to begin the Second Vatican Council. That council, especially in its revolutionary "Declaration on the Church's Attitude toward Non-Christian Religions" (Nostra Aetate), is where for me things took off--where I first felt the challenge of religious diversity and the inspiration to take up the challenge. Vatican II opened the door http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Dialogue and Liberation: What I Have Learned from My Friends—Buddhist and Christian

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 34 (1) – Feb 3, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

Paul Knitter Union Theological Seminary My co-coordinator for this conference, Kyeongil Jung, has given me a rather daunting assignment for this lecture: within no more than forty minutes, I am supposed to (1) draw some insightful conclusions for our conference, (2) bid farewell to Union Theological Seminary as I sail off into retirement, and (3) reminisce on the past fifty years of my life. The easiest and most enjoyable of these assignments will, I suspect, be the most effective in covering them all: I'm going to focus on reminiscing. It all started for me more than fifty years ago as I stood in the Piazza San Pietro on October 11, 1962, having just arrived in Rome two weeks earlier to begin my theological studies at the Gregorian University. There, awestruck and euphoric, I watched Pope John XXIII lead some two thousand bishops into the Basilica of St. Peter to begin the Second Vatican Council. That council, especially in its revolutionary "Declaration on the Church's Attitude toward Non-Christian Religions" (Nostra Aetate), is where for me things took off--where I first felt the challenge of religious diversity and the inspiration to take up the challenge. Vatican II opened the door

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 3, 2014

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