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Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese American Internment (review)

Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese American Internment (review) journal of world history, june 2005 gender and cultural practices of Soviet citizens. This work will appeal to those interested in the relationships among colonialism, gender, religion, culture, and identity, as well as scholars of Stalinism, the Russian Revolution, and Central Asia. sharon a. kowalsky Georgetown University Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese American Internment. By brian masaru hayashi. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2004. 328 pp. $35.00 (cloth). Numerous scholars have explored the subject of Japanese internment during World War II, and their explanations for internment have largely focused on domestic factors. Most have neglected the wider, global context that influenced the decision makers and ultimately the internees as well. In this detailed and extensively researched work, Hayashi reexamines Japanese internment by relying on previously unreleased documents and recently declassified material and analyzes both the domestic and international considerations that shaped the decision to incarcerate Japanese in the United States. In addition, Hayashi investigates the significance of internment not just as it affected Japanese Americans but also as it influenced domestic issues such as water rights and land development. Moreover, he discusses how U.S. officials applied the "lessons learned" in educating Japanese Americans in democracy to other peoples http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese American Internment (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 16 (2) – Nov 21, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, june 2005 gender and cultural practices of Soviet citizens. This work will appeal to those interested in the relationships among colonialism, gender, religion, culture, and identity, as well as scholars of Stalinism, the Russian Revolution, and Central Asia. sharon a. kowalsky Georgetown University Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese American Internment. By brian masaru hayashi. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2004. 328 pp. $35.00 (cloth). Numerous scholars have explored the subject of Japanese internment during World War II, and their explanations for internment have largely focused on domestic factors. Most have neglected the wider, global context that influenced the decision makers and ultimately the internees as well. In this detailed and extensively researched work, Hayashi reexamines Japanese internment by relying on previously unreleased documents and recently declassified material and analyzes both the domestic and international considerations that shaped the decision to incarcerate Japanese in the United States. In addition, Hayashi investigates the significance of internment not just as it affected Japanese Americans but also as it influenced domestic issues such as water rights and land development. Moreover, he discusses how U.S. officials applied the "lessons learned" in educating Japanese Americans in democracy to other peoples

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 21, 2005

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