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Decolonization and Its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empires (review)

Decolonization and Its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empires (review) journal of world history, march 2009 perity at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries made it possible to follow Chile's example, though many Argentines distrusted Germany by this point because of its strong ties to Chile. Argentina's wealth helped make it the major military power on the continent by the outbreak of World War I. Brazil was the slowest to reform. This failure seems ironic considering the fact that the first two presidents following the establishment of the republic in 1889 were military men who were all too aware of how inadequate the armed forces were. Long-standing civilian distrust of the military and the weakness of the national government during the Old Republic made it possible for state governments, when given a chance, to make it impossible, for example, to institute obligatory military service. (Decades later, Brazil's alliance with the United States in World War II, combined with pro-Axis sympathies in Argentina, transformed the balance of power on the continent.) It should be noted that one long-term result of changes introduced by civilian governments was the weakening of civilian authority over the military. I would have liked to see Resende-Santos develop his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Decolonization and Its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empires (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 20 (1) – May 3, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, march 2009 perity at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries made it possible to follow Chile's example, though many Argentines distrusted Germany by this point because of its strong ties to Chile. Argentina's wealth helped make it the major military power on the continent by the outbreak of World War I. Brazil was the slowest to reform. This failure seems ironic considering the fact that the first two presidents following the establishment of the republic in 1889 were military men who were all too aware of how inadequate the armed forces were. Long-standing civilian distrust of the military and the weakness of the national government during the Old Republic made it possible for state governments, when given a chance, to make it impossible, for example, to institute obligatory military service. (Decades later, Brazil's alliance with the United States in World War II, combined with pro-Axis sympathies in Argentina, transformed the balance of power on the continent.) It should be noted that one long-term result of changes introduced by civilian governments was the weakening of civilian authority over the military. I would have liked to see Resende-Santos develop his

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 3, 2009

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