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Death, Eroticism, and Virtual Nationalism in the Films of Hong Sangsoo

Death, Eroticism, and Virtual Nationalism in the Films of Hong Sangsoo by Kyung Hyun Kim On Cinema but I could see her permed hair and plump white limbs. She was wearing a thin red sweater and a white skirt. It must have been rather cold early in the morning. Or maybe she had a liking for that outfit. Her head was resting on rubber shoes with flowery patterns and lying on the ground in the rain and a few feet away from her limp lifeless hand was a white handkerchief, which, as it did not blow about in the wind, seemed to be wrapped around something. To get a glimpse of her face, the children stood in the stream facing my way. Their blue school uniforms were reflected upside down on the water and were like blue flags surrounding the corpse. Strangely, I felt rising within me a great surge of physical desire for the dead woman. I hurriedly left the scene.1 The passage above is from "A Journey to Mujin," [Mujin kihaeng] a story by Kim Sng'ok that established him as one of the most celebrated writers of the post-Korean War era in addition * A small portion of this essay appeared under the title "The Awkward Traveller http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture University of Hawai'I Press

Death, Eroticism, and Virtual Nationalism in the Films of Hong Sangsoo

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1944-6500
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Abstract

by Kyung Hyun Kim On Cinema but I could see her permed hair and plump white limbs. She was wearing a thin red sweater and a white skirt. It must have been rather cold early in the morning. Or maybe she had a liking for that outfit. Her head was resting on rubber shoes with flowery patterns and lying on the ground in the rain and a few feet away from her limp lifeless hand was a white handkerchief, which, as it did not blow about in the wind, seemed to be wrapped around something. To get a glimpse of her face, the children stood in the stream facing my way. Their blue school uniforms were reflected upside down on the water and were like blue flags surrounding the corpse. Strangely, I felt rising within me a great surge of physical desire for the dead woman. I hurriedly left the scene.1 The passage above is from "A Journey to Mujin," [Mujin kihaeng] a story by Kim Sng'ok that established him as one of the most celebrated writers of the post-Korean War era in addition * A small portion of this essay appeared under the title "The Awkward Traveller

Journal

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & CultureUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 22, 2010

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