Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Daya Krishna: A Philosopher and Much More

Daya Krishna: A Philosopher and Much More Shail Mayaram Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi Exploring Daya Krishna's life is a journey into the enormous possibilities of a life of the mind and the fullest development of the senses. It is a life that signals the fabric of intellectual life in postcolonial India and the non-West. But it was not just as a philosopher that he touched and radiated the lives of so many. No, not as a guru-- an institution he disdained--for ultimately what is important, he once told me, is to discover the guru within oneself. Of being-in-life creatively, lovingly, and joyfully, but always critically! And by approaching death without fear--indeed, reveling in its potentiality for complete freedom. Daya Krishna lived a beautiful life and left this world in a particularly beautiful way--serving sweets and water to a visiting student--a gesture that a philosopher from Jaipur interpreted as symbolizing his hospitality to the ideas of others, particularly younger people. It was an iccha-mrtyu (a willed death), as Srivatsa Goswami reminded me. He had time and again expressed his feeling that this, his eighty-third, was his last birthday and that people were living too long; and had ensured that his unpublished manuscripts, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Daya Krishna: A Philosopher and Much More

Philosophy East and West , Volume 58 (4) – Nov 12, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/daya-krishna-a-philosopher-and-much-more-tEE4IJ3PFQ
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Shail Mayaram Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi Exploring Daya Krishna's life is a journey into the enormous possibilities of a life of the mind and the fullest development of the senses. It is a life that signals the fabric of intellectual life in postcolonial India and the non-West. But it was not just as a philosopher that he touched and radiated the lives of so many. No, not as a guru-- an institution he disdained--for ultimately what is important, he once told me, is to discover the guru within oneself. Of being-in-life creatively, lovingly, and joyfully, but always critically! And by approaching death without fear--indeed, reveling in its potentiality for complete freedom. Daya Krishna lived a beautiful life and left this world in a particularly beautiful way--serving sweets and water to a visiting student--a gesture that a philosopher from Jaipur interpreted as symbolizing his hospitality to the ideas of others, particularly younger people. It was an iccha-mrtyu (a willed death), as Srivatsa Goswami reminded me. He had time and again expressed his feeling that this, his eighty-third, was his last birthday and that people were living too long; and had ensured that his unpublished manuscripts,

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 12, 2008

There are no references for this article.