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Dakini's Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism (review)

Dakini's Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism (review) 4_133-201 9/3/03 7:31 AM Page 161 BOOK R EV I EWS 161 Grove, Indiana, in September 2001, that launched the book, Barry said that he had, over the years, become intimate with the cadences of Benedict’s rustic Latin and that he had tried to carry them over into English. He has succeeded admirably. In the passage quoted, the rhythm (four strong beats) of the Latin is brilliantly reproduced in English. His translation may well become the standard version read in Anglo- phone monasteries and convents. Roger Corless Duke University (Emeritus) DAKINI’S WARM BREATH: THE FEMININE PRINCIPLE IN TIBETAN BUDDHISM. By Judith Simmer-Brown. Boston: Shambhala, 2001. xxv + 404 pp. For more than a century, the dakini of Hindu and Buddhist tantric literature and practice lore has intrigued, fascinated, beguiled, and confounded Western scholars. First described by Austine Waddell in 1895 as “demonical furies” and “she-devils,” S. C. Das’s ATibetan-English Dictionary, published just shortly afterward, defined mkha’ ’gro ma (the Tibetan equivalent of the Sanskrit term dakini ) as “a class, mainly of female sprites, akin to our witches, but not necessarily ugly or deformed.” More recently the dakini has been investigated by scholars as diverse as David Snellgrove, Rene http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Dakini's Warm Breath: The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 23 – Oct 29, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

4_133-201 9/3/03 7:31 AM Page 161 BOOK R EV I EWS 161 Grove, Indiana, in September 2001, that launched the book, Barry said that he had, over the years, become intimate with the cadences of Benedict’s rustic Latin and that he had tried to carry them over into English. He has succeeded admirably. In the passage quoted, the rhythm (four strong beats) of the Latin is brilliantly reproduced in English. His translation may well become the standard version read in Anglo- phone monasteries and convents. Roger Corless Duke University (Emeritus) DAKINI’S WARM BREATH: THE FEMININE PRINCIPLE IN TIBETAN BUDDHISM. By Judith Simmer-Brown. Boston: Shambhala, 2001. xxv + 404 pp. For more than a century, the dakini of Hindu and Buddhist tantric literature and practice lore has intrigued, fascinated, beguiled, and confounded Western scholars. First described by Austine Waddell in 1895 as “demonical furies” and “she-devils,” S. C. Das’s ATibetan-English Dictionary, published just shortly afterward, defined mkha’ ’gro ma (the Tibetan equivalent of the Sanskrit term dakini ) as “a class, mainly of female sprites, akin to our witches, but not necessarily ugly or deformed.” More recently the dakini has been investigated by scholars as diverse as David Snellgrove, Rene

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 29, 2003

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