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Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West (review)

Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West (review) BCS 21 pp. i-viii, 1-164 12/5/01 6:24 PM Page 140 140 BOOK REVIEWS elusive fourth, which are necessary to express what we mean by God in Buddhist terms (305–306 ). One of the most original things Münch does is to draw a parallel between the Zen ox-herding pictures and the Christian story. This serves to draw together pictorially, if not conceptually, the sometimes arcane researches that go to make up Münch’s mosaic. It is perhaps because spatially dimensional thinking has been so rare in West- ern science, philosophy, and theology that he must search in such dark corners for evidence of it. The result is an at times bewildering patchwork of apparently unre- lated contributions that do not blend smoothly into a unity. This sometimes puz- zling heterogeneity is justified, in my view, in that it presents us with a highly diver- sified tool kit for getting to work on the potential offered by Buddhist philosophical thinking to Christian theology. A large part of the book is taken up with a recapitu- lation of the Cobb-Abe dialogue and other dialogue conferences for German readers, but Münch’s purpose is to free us to look beyond the Kyoto School to other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Culture and Self: Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, East and West (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 21 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

BCS 21 pp. i-viii, 1-164 12/5/01 6:24 PM Page 140 140 BOOK REVIEWS elusive fourth, which are necessary to express what we mean by God in Buddhist terms (305–306 ). One of the most original things Münch does is to draw a parallel between the Zen ox-herding pictures and the Christian story. This serves to draw together pictorially, if not conceptually, the sometimes arcane researches that go to make up Münch’s mosaic. It is perhaps because spatially dimensional thinking has been so rare in West- ern science, philosophy, and theology that he must search in such dark corners for evidence of it. The result is an at times bewildering patchwork of apparently unre- lated contributions that do not blend smoothly into a unity. This sometimes puz- zling heterogeneity is justified, in my view, in that it presents us with a highly diver- sified tool kit for getting to work on the potential offered by Buddhist philosophical thinking to Christian theology. A large part of the book is taken up with a recapitu- lation of the Cobb-Abe dialogue and other dialogue conferences for German readers, but Münch’s purpose is to free us to look beyond the Kyoto School to other

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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