Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cultural Studies for Oceania

Cultural Studies for Oceania <p>A new research perspective is emerging in Oceania, one based on combining practices drawn from both Pacific Islander and continental cultures. This emerging perspective, here labeled "cultural studies for Oceania," differs from most Pacific Studies research as well as from continental cultural studies. This new practice is characterized by combinations of the following: an emphasis on personal identities and on specifying distinct research roles for Pacific Islanders and non-Natives; efforts to forge a unifying regional identity; research focused on processes more than on final products; reciprocity between researchers and those they study; prominent use of Oceania epistemologies; unconventional research-reporting genres; reliance on oral practices and traditions; dependence on Pacific Islander models, concepts, and theories. Research programs that embrace these features offer a promising alternative to the dominant research practices in the region, which continue to perpetuate earlier colonizations.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Cultural Studies for Oceania

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (2) – Aug 7, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/cultural-studies-for-oceania-1h36LKh5Qg
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

<p>A new research perspective is emerging in Oceania, one based on combining practices drawn from both Pacific Islander and continental cultures. This emerging perspective, here labeled "cultural studies for Oceania," differs from most Pacific Studies research as well as from continental cultural studies. This new practice is characterized by combinations of the following: an emphasis on personal identities and on specifying distinct research roles for Pacific Islanders and non-Natives; efforts to forge a unifying regional identity; research focused on processes more than on final products; reciprocity between researchers and those they study; prominent use of Oceania epistemologies; unconventional research-reporting genres; reliance on oral practices and traditions; dependence on Pacific Islander models, concepts, and theories. Research programs that embrace these features offer a promising alternative to the dominant research practices in the region, which continue to perpetuate earlier colonizations.</p>

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 7, 2003

There are no references for this article.