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Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera (review)

Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera (review) Mae Smethurst gives a more literal rendering of the original. Moreover, both Japanese texts are printed at the end of the book, which helps the language student to become familiar with the nö. This is not tedious repetition, but an invitation to engage in the translation process. The exploration is enriched as we find in the essays of authors such as Klein, LaFleur, and Thornhill further congenial renderings of important passages in the play. Last but not least, Monica Bethe offers invaluable help in approaching the nö as performance ("Ominameshi and Considerations of Costume and Mask"), insisting upon the hermeneutic work of the actors and stage practitioners themselves. The actor's voice is also recorded, as Uzawa Hisa, perhaps the most prominent female actor at present, imparts to us her impressions on the conference ("Reflections on Participating in the 1997 Ominameshi Conference"). The book is aimed at Western readers, with attention to Japanese audiences as well. Japanese articles are published in the original, while English articles have Japanese abstracts. This substantial collection proves that American scholarly discourse within nö studies has reached a high level of sophistication. American scholars can mingle their voices in the chorus of Japanese specialists http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 22 (1) – Feb 15, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

Mae Smethurst gives a more literal rendering of the original. Moreover, both Japanese texts are printed at the end of the book, which helps the language student to become familiar with the nö. This is not tedious repetition, but an invitation to engage in the translation process. The exploration is enriched as we find in the essays of authors such as Klein, LaFleur, and Thornhill further congenial renderings of important passages in the play. Last but not least, Monica Bethe offers invaluable help in approaching the nö as performance ("Ominameshi and Considerations of Costume and Mask"), insisting upon the hermeneutic work of the actors and stage practitioners themselves. The actor's voice is also recorded, as Uzawa Hisa, perhaps the most prominent female actor at present, imparts to us her impressions on the conference ("Reflections on Participating in the 1997 Ominameshi Conference"). The book is aimed at Western readers, with attention to Japanese audiences as well. Japanese articles are published in the original, while English articles have Japanese abstracts. This substantial collection proves that American scholarly discourse within nö studies has reached a high level of sophistication. American scholars can mingle their voices in the chorus of Japanese specialists

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 15, 2005

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