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Critical Essay on British South Asian Theatre ed. by Graham Ley and Sarah Dadswell (review)

Critical Essay on British South Asian Theatre ed. by Graham Ley and Sarah Dadswell (review) tices. This is, of course, understandable when works largely arise from social justice concerns and use comic critique or Brechtian interventions. Some groups (Tara) have approached the aesthetics of the subcontinent and folk or classical dance theatre sometimes attempted Indian based genres, coinciding with the period that Indian modern drama artists began to look for their own "Theatre of Roots." There is work that links some groups with contemporary artists of South Asia. We see forays into the intercultural experiments as Anuradha Kapur of the National Drama School in Delhi collaborated on a piece on communalism in 1985 using folk theatre techniques. But much of the content deals with immigration, intergenerational conflict, gender issues in an English frame, and sometimes histories of colonialism. The ethnicity of actors, playwrights, or directors may be Asian, but as with the Asian American theatre movement the emphasis and aesthetic are often less Indian, Bengali, or Pakistani than part of the shared culture (here British) in which the artists live. In the final chapter the authors briefly compare and contrast the groups. The weight in this volume is on careful description of each group. The work is to be applauded. The video clips http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Critical Essay on British South Asian Theatre ed. by Graham Ley and Sarah Dadswell (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 30 (1) – Jun 6, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
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Abstract

tices. This is, of course, understandable when works largely arise from social justice concerns and use comic critique or Brechtian interventions. Some groups (Tara) have approached the aesthetics of the subcontinent and folk or classical dance theatre sometimes attempted Indian based genres, coinciding with the period that Indian modern drama artists began to look for their own "Theatre of Roots." There is work that links some groups with contemporary artists of South Asia. We see forays into the intercultural experiments as Anuradha Kapur of the National Drama School in Delhi collaborated on a piece on communalism in 1985 using folk theatre techniques. But much of the content deals with immigration, intergenerational conflict, gender issues in an English frame, and sometimes histories of colonialism. The ethnicity of actors, playwrights, or directors may be Asian, but as with the Asian American theatre movement the emphasis and aesthetic are often less Indian, Bengali, or Pakistani than part of the shared culture (here British) in which the artists live. In the final chapter the authors briefly compare and contrast the groups. The weight in this volume is on careful description of each group. The work is to be applauded. The video clips

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 6, 2013

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