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Could There Be Mystical Evidence for a Nondual Brahman? A Causal Objection

Could There Be Mystical Evidence for a Nondual Brahman? A Causal Objection The University of Texas at Austin Introduction This article has three sections: an introduction, a stretch of textual interpretation, and a final evaluative argument. The upshot of the middle section is that the eighthÂ Ç century Advaitin Sankara in his commentary on the first four sutras of the BrahmaÅ sutra (the catuhsutrõ ) intimates a mystic/sensory parallelism thesis. Brahman as a Å Å Å Ç preexistent reality not dependent on human cognition (or activity) gives rise to mystical knowledge (brahma-vidya) in a fashion parallel to the way that objects of senÅ sory experience give rise to sensory information. The upshot of the final section is a Â Ç certain worry about this parallelism thesis, namely that Sankara's metaphysics of Brahman precludes the sort of causal story that a true mystic parallelism would entail. I shall also explore resources within the Advaita view for answering such a causal objection and comment on the overall viability of a mystical argument for Brahman. The second section is perhaps best framed by a few points about our own intelÂ Ç lectual culture. Sankara is a Vedantin, and Vedanta is a school of classical Indian Å Å philosophy whose advocates expressly proclaim reason http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Could There Be Mystical Evidence for a Nondual Brahman? A Causal Objection

Philosophy East and West , Volume 51 (4) – Jan 10, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

The University of Texas at Austin Introduction This article has three sections: an introduction, a stretch of textual interpretation, and a final evaluative argument. The upshot of the middle section is that the eighthÂ Ç century Advaitin Sankara in his commentary on the first four sutras of the BrahmaÅ sutra (the catuhsutrõ ) intimates a mystic/sensory parallelism thesis. Brahman as a Å Å Å Ç preexistent reality not dependent on human cognition (or activity) gives rise to mystical knowledge (brahma-vidya) in a fashion parallel to the way that objects of senÅ sory experience give rise to sensory information. The upshot of the final section is a Â Ç certain worry about this parallelism thesis, namely that Sankara's metaphysics of Brahman precludes the sort of causal story that a true mystic parallelism would entail. I shall also explore resources within the Advaita view for answering such a causal objection and comment on the overall viability of a mystical argument for Brahman. The second section is perhaps best framed by a few points about our own intelÂ Ç lectual culture. Sankara is a Vedantin, and Vedanta is a school of classical Indian Å Å philosophy whose advocates expressly proclaim reason

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 10, 2001

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