Corruption by Design: Building Clean Government in Mainland China and Hong Kong (review)

Corruption by Design: Building Clean Government in Mainland China and Hong Kong (review) Reviews Women and Buddhist and Daoist clergy were excluded, so the pool of candidates was exclusive. When we add to this competition the educational requirement to master non-vernacular classical texts, we can grasp the educational barrier between those licensed to take examinations and those who could not because they were classically illiterate. Overall, licentiates were not peasants, artisans, clergy, or women. What ManCheong and others who follow Ping-ti Ho mean by "social mobility" might be better described as a healthy circulation of lower and upper elites. When we add the even healthier circulation of partially literate non-elites, who were the unintended by-products of the civil examination's educational process, then we will better understand the "meanings of examinations" for the many and not just the few in imperial China, such as the "class of 76." Benjamin Elman Benjamin Elman is a professor of East Asian studies and history at Princeton University. He specializes in Ming-Qing cultural history, 400­900, and the history of science and education in China, 000­900. Melanie Manion. Corruption by Design: Building Clean Government in Mainland China and Hong Kong. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004. 49.95, isbn 0­674­0486­3. After replacing a planned economy with a market http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Corruption by Design: Building Clean Government in Mainland China and Hong Kong (review)

China Review International, Volume 12 (1) – Dec 6, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews Women and Buddhist and Daoist clergy were excluded, so the pool of candidates was exclusive. When we add to this competition the educational requirement to master non-vernacular classical texts, we can grasp the educational barrier between those licensed to take examinations and those who could not because they were classically illiterate. Overall, licentiates were not peasants, artisans, clergy, or women. What ManCheong and others who follow Ping-ti Ho mean by "social mobility" might be better described as a healthy circulation of lower and upper elites. When we add the even healthier circulation of partially literate non-elites, who were the unintended by-products of the civil examination's educational process, then we will better understand the "meanings of examinations" for the many and not just the few in imperial China, such as the "class of 76." Benjamin Elman Benjamin Elman is a professor of East Asian studies and history at Princeton University. He specializes in Ming-Qing cultural history, 400­900, and the history of science and education in China, 000­900. Melanie Manion. Corruption by Design: Building Clean Government in Mainland China and Hong Kong. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004. 49.95, isbn 0­674­0486­3. After replacing a planned economy with a market

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 6, 2005

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