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Contrasting Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and Buddhist Explanations of Attention

Contrasting Nyāya-Vaiśeá¹£ika and Buddhist Explanations of Attention <p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay contrasts Nyāya-VaiÅ›eá¹£ika and Buddhist explanations of attention. Section 1 lays out the ontological postulates that Nyāya-VaiÅ›eá¹£ikas and Buddhists deemed necessary for the explanation of attention. Section 2 looks at three arguments that the Nyāya-VaiÅ›eá¹£ikas gave for their principal postulate, the manas, and three corresponding Buddhist responses to these arguments. Sections 3 and 4 look at contrasting Nyāya-VaiÅ›eá¹£ika and Buddhist explanations of, respectively, "shifts of attention" and "competition for attention." Section 5 considers whether the Buddhist model can adequately account for voluntary or endogenous attention, and whether the Nyāya-VaiÅ›eá¹£ika model can adequately account for involuntary or exogenous attention. The final section identifies three things that are commonly attributed to attention and that may seem impossible in both the Nyāya-VaiÅ›eá¹£ika and the Buddhist models; it shows how the two Indian models can account for them.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Contrasting Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and Buddhist Explanations of Attention

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (4) – Feb 15, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This essay contrasts Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and Buddhist explanations of attention. Section 1 lays out the ontological postulates that Nyāya-Vaiśeṣikas and Buddhists deemed necessary for the explanation of attention. Section 2 looks at three arguments that the Nyāya-Vaiśeṣikas gave for their principal postulate, the manas, and three corresponding Buddhist responses to these arguments. Sections 3 and 4 look at contrasting Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and Buddhist explanations of, respectively, "shifts of attention" and "competition for attention." Section 5 considers whether the Buddhist model can adequately account for voluntary or endogenous attention, and whether the Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika model can adequately account for involuntary or exogenous attention. The final section identifies three things that are commonly attributed to attention and that may seem impossible in both the Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and the Buddhist models; it shows how the two Indian models can account for them.</p>

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 15, 2019

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