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Consumer Culture, Market Empire, and the Global South

Consumer Culture, Market Empire, and the Global South james p. woodard Montclair State University the span a years, the cenI nconsumptionofjustfew scoreclusterscontained entirely withinin flux-- tury that has passed, of models, patterns, and practices of and their promotion--themselves constantly attained global ubiquity, transcending the privileged corners of Englishspeaking North America often identified as their places of conception and becoming part of the everyday lives of men, women, and children the world over, including uncounted millions whose poverty renders them marginal participants in the world of mass-marketed goods. During these years, the automobile ditched the deprecatory denomination of "rich man's toy" as the family car became a key marker of middle-class arrival, while automobiling overtook older forms of transport, travel, and community even in states whose leaders professed an antipathy to the possessive individualism so often identified with that class. Massmarketed entertainments replaced or remade existing pastimes, performances, and festivities while introducing mores and modalities often identified as corrosive of lifeways of relative long standing. Advertising, in seemingly inexhaustible forms and fora, seemed to fuel this secular transformation even as it was sustained by it. Sweet commerce itself was made and remade, cast and recast--unevenly and on occasion unsuccessfully, to be sure, but impressively and always relentlessly. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Consumer Culture, Market Empire, and the Global South

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (2) – Aug 9, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

james p. woodard Montclair State University the span a years, the cenI nconsumptionofjustfew scoreclusterscontained entirely withinin flux-- tury that has passed, of models, patterns, and practices of and their promotion--themselves constantly attained global ubiquity, transcending the privileged corners of Englishspeaking North America often identified as their places of conception and becoming part of the everyday lives of men, women, and children the world over, including uncounted millions whose poverty renders them marginal participants in the world of mass-marketed goods. During these years, the automobile ditched the deprecatory denomination of "rich man's toy" as the family car became a key marker of middle-class arrival, while automobiling overtook older forms of transport, travel, and community even in states whose leaders professed an antipathy to the possessive individualism so often identified with that class. Massmarketed entertainments replaced or remade existing pastimes, performances, and festivities while introducing mores and modalities often identified as corrosive of lifeways of relative long standing. Advertising, in seemingly inexhaustible forms and fora, seemed to fuel this secular transformation even as it was sustained by it. Sweet commerce itself was made and remade, cast and recast--unevenly and on occasion unsuccessfully, to be sure, but impressively and always relentlessly.

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 9, 2012

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