Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Conservation Is Our Government Now: The Politics of Ecology in Papua New Guinea (review)

Conservation Is Our Government Now: The Politics of Ecology in Papua New Guinea (review) the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) not reengage with the serious problems besetting Oceanic communities. While perhaps too generalized and too closely associated with the concerns of one (albeit large) faction of Christian churches, Ernst's analysis raises profoundly important questions about the current reshaping of religion in the Pacific Islands. In the national surveys especially, the volume makes an enormous contribution to knowledge and will remain an essential resource for scholars, believers, and the merely curious, for many years to come. thus obliged to critique authority and seek "to improve the current social order" (733). Unfortunately, however, mainline churches in Oceania today have generally failed to live up to their moral obligations to the distressed communities they serve. Ernst ends the book with a passionate plea for mainline churches to embrace a "liberating theology" that will directly confront the evils of globalization. It is not hard to poke holes in Ernst's analysis. The statistical data that form the empirical basis for tracking changes in church membership are uneven, often unreliable and difficult to interpret. As Philip Gibbs points out for Papua New Guinea (148), people shift their allegiance between churches for a vast variety of reasons most of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Conservation Is Our Government Now: The Politics of Ecology in Papua New Guinea (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (2) – Aug 13, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/conservation-is-our-government-now-the-politics-of-ecology-in-papua-ArXhxieeXy
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) not reengage with the serious problems besetting Oceanic communities. While perhaps too generalized and too closely associated with the concerns of one (albeit large) faction of Christian churches, Ernst's analysis raises profoundly important questions about the current reshaping of religion in the Pacific Islands. In the national surveys especially, the volume makes an enormous contribution to knowledge and will remain an essential resource for scholars, believers, and the merely curious, for many years to come. thus obliged to critique authority and seek "to improve the current social order" (733). Unfortunately, however, mainline churches in Oceania today have generally failed to live up to their moral obligations to the distressed communities they serve. Ernst ends the book with a passionate plea for mainline churches to embrace a "liberating theology" that will directly confront the evils of globalization. It is not hard to poke holes in Ernst's analysis. The statistical data that form the empirical basis for tracking changes in church membership are uneven, often unreliable and difficult to interpret. As Philip Gibbs points out for Papua New Guinea (148), people shift their allegiance between churches for a vast variety of reasons most of

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

There are no references for this article.