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Consequential Damages of Nuclear War: The Rongelap Report (review)

Consequential Damages of Nuclear War: The Rongelap Report (review) book and media reviews 401 characterized in chants as a small, the rebirth of Kaho‘olawe as a living fragile child of the goddess Hina, and island. A big step toward the fi rst goal is considered more in need of nurtur- has been taken with its conveyance to ing than the larger islands. Today, the state of Hawai‘i. The second aim Moloka‘i has a mixture of traditional is too dangerous to ever achieve fully, subsistence farming, fi shing, hunt- but within “cleared” areas, revegeta- ing, and gathering along with some tion and cultural activities are now homesteading, with produce entering taking place, in service of the third the cash economy. Moloka‘i is also objective: Kaho‘olawe is coming back the home of some of the fi rst of the to life. Knowledge about the ocean, kua‘äina who began to oppose the bays, currents, and channels from United States’ control and abuse of the kua‘äina living on neighbor islands nearby island of Kaho‘olawe, which has enabled members of the Protect many Hawaiians knew as a once Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana to land and sacred place. survive on the island as they work to Formerly used as a penal colony, restore shrines (heiau) and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Consequential Damages of Nuclear War: The Rongelap Report (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 21 (2) – Aug 29, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

book and media reviews 401 characterized in chants as a small, the rebirth of Kaho‘olawe as a living fragile child of the goddess Hina, and island. A big step toward the fi rst goal is considered more in need of nurtur- has been taken with its conveyance to ing than the larger islands. Today, the state of Hawai‘i. The second aim Moloka‘i has a mixture of traditional is too dangerous to ever achieve fully, subsistence farming, fi shing, hunt- but within “cleared” areas, revegeta- ing, and gathering along with some tion and cultural activities are now homesteading, with produce entering taking place, in service of the third the cash economy. Moloka‘i is also objective: Kaho‘olawe is coming back the home of some of the fi rst of the to life. Knowledge about the ocean, kua‘äina who began to oppose the bays, currents, and channels from United States’ control and abuse of the kua‘äina living on neighbor islands nearby island of Kaho‘olawe, which has enabled members of the Protect many Hawaiians knew as a once Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana to land and sacred place. survive on the island as they work to Formerly used as a penal colony, restore shrines (heiau) and

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 29, 2009

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