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Confucianism by Paul R. Goldin (review)

Confucianism by Paul R. Goldin (review) Reviews 67 less than carefully. As an example, she writes that “[a]ccording to Mingshi (Official history of the Ming dynasty), Ding’s long-term appointment in Nanjing resulted from his defying the powerful chief councilor Zhang Juzheng in Beijing p” ( . 280), but his biography in Mingshi records plainly that Ding Bin incurred Zhang’s hatred in the early years of his career by refusing to follow blindly the powerful senior grand secretary and was subsequently forced out of office. Ding’s three-decade career in Nanjing began in 1591, nine years aer Zh ft ang’s death in 1582, and he remained there until retirement in 1620. Clearly, his lengthy service in the southern capital had nothing to do with the long dead Zhang Juzheng. Despite the reservations mentioned above, Fei’s book overall adopts a con- vincing approach, provides detailed case studies, and presents its arguments with clarity. Conversing extremely well with the existing scholarship on the city, urban- ization, and urbanism in imperial China, it is undoubtedly a major contribution to the studies of history of urbanization in imperial China and of Ming Nanjing. Jun Fang Jun Fang is an associate professor of history specializing in studies of Yuan-Ming China at Huron http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Confucianism by Paul R. Goldin (review)

China Review International , Volume 19 (1) – Feb 19, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 67 less than carefully. As an example, she writes that “[a]ccording to Mingshi (Official history of the Ming dynasty), Ding’s long-term appointment in Nanjing resulted from his defying the powerful chief councilor Zhang Juzheng in Beijing p” ( . 280), but his biography in Mingshi records plainly that Ding Bin incurred Zhang’s hatred in the early years of his career by refusing to follow blindly the powerful senior grand secretary and was subsequently forced out of office. Ding’s three-decade career in Nanjing began in 1591, nine years aer Zh ft ang’s death in 1582, and he remained there until retirement in 1620. Clearly, his lengthy service in the southern capital had nothing to do with the long dead Zhang Juzheng. Despite the reservations mentioned above, Fei’s book overall adopts a con- vincing approach, provides detailed case studies, and presents its arguments with clarity. Conversing extremely well with the existing scholarship on the city, urban- ization, and urbanism in imperial China, it is undoubtedly a major contribution to the studies of history of urbanization in imperial China and of Ming Nanjing. Jun Fang Jun Fang is an associate professor of history specializing in studies of Yuan-Ming China at Huron

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 19, 2014

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