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Confucian Tradition and Global Education (review)

Confucian Tradition and Global Education (review) Reviews 93 Voices in Revolution makes a powerful argument for the centrality of sound and voice in modern Chinese poetry and represents a timely and important contribution to the field of modern Chinese literature and culture. More than anything, it shows us how intricately bound modern Chinese poetry has always been in the perception of China as a modern nation and the unanimous goal of China's writers, intellectuals, and leaders--regardless of the political context--to let China's voice be heard. Heather Inwood Heather Inwood is an assistant professor of modern Chinese cultural studies at Ohio State University. Her research focuses on the relationship between new media and contemporary culture in the People's Republic of China. Note 1. Peter Middleton, Distant Reading: Performance, Readership and Consumption in Contemporary Poetry (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2005), p. xii. William Theodore De Bary, with contributions by Cheung Chan Fai and Kwan Tze-wan. Confucian Tradition and Global Education. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007. iii, 113 pp. Hardcover $32.50, isbn 978962-996-304-0. William Theodore De Bary's most recent book, Confucian Tradition and Global Education, is a collection of lectures given in honor of Tang Junyi, with two additional essays by Cheung Chan Fai and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Confucian Tradition and Global Education (review)

China Review International , Volume 16 (1) – Sep 15, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 93 Voices in Revolution makes a powerful argument for the centrality of sound and voice in modern Chinese poetry and represents a timely and important contribution to the field of modern Chinese literature and culture. More than anything, it shows us how intricately bound modern Chinese poetry has always been in the perception of China as a modern nation and the unanimous goal of China's writers, intellectuals, and leaders--regardless of the political context--to let China's voice be heard. Heather Inwood Heather Inwood is an assistant professor of modern Chinese cultural studies at Ohio State University. Her research focuses on the relationship between new media and contemporary culture in the People's Republic of China. Note 1. Peter Middleton, Distant Reading: Performance, Readership and Consumption in Contemporary Poetry (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2005), p. xii. William Theodore De Bary, with contributions by Cheung Chan Fai and Kwan Tze-wan. Confucian Tradition and Global Education. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007. iii, 113 pp. Hardcover $32.50, isbn 978962-996-304-0. William Theodore De Bary's most recent book, Confucian Tradition and Global Education, is a collection of lectures given in honor of Tang Junyi, with two additional essays by Cheung Chan Fai and

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 15, 2009

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