Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Confucian Pragmatism as the Art of Contextualizing Personal Experience and World (review)

Confucian Pragmatism as the Art of Contextualizing Personal Experience and World (review) China Review International: Vol. 16, No. 4, 2009 the book to the various developments in East Asia, especially those in Korea and Japan, would be most welcome. These comments are not meant to undermine the scholarly accomplishments of this well-written book. Having challenged established ideas and provided insights into the development of Song Chan traditions, this book will serve as a vital point of departure for future Chan studies. It is an important book that specialists of East Asian Buddhism and Chinese intellectual history can ill afford to ignore. It will be required reading for all students of Chan/Zen. I would also recommend this book, written clearly and in an engaging style, to nonspecialists who might be interested in the topic. Finally, I must add that this book can fruitfully be read with two other volumes on Song Buddhism: Mark Halperin's Out of the Cloister: Literati Perspectives on Buddhism in Sung China, 960­1279 and Albert Welter's The Linji lu and the Creation of Chan Orthodoxy. Chiew Hui Ho Chiew Hui Ho is a PhD candidate in the Department of Religious Studies at Stanford University. His research focuses on indigenous Buddhist narratives of the Tang period. Haiming Wen. Confucian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Confucian Pragmatism as the Art of Contextualizing Personal Experience and World (review)

China Review International , Volume 16 (4) – Jul 13, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/confucian-pragmatism-as-the-art-of-contextualizing-personal-experience-Ul10LmvTLE
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

China Review International: Vol. 16, No. 4, 2009 the book to the various developments in East Asia, especially those in Korea and Japan, would be most welcome. These comments are not meant to undermine the scholarly accomplishments of this well-written book. Having challenged established ideas and provided insights into the development of Song Chan traditions, this book will serve as a vital point of departure for future Chan studies. It is an important book that specialists of East Asian Buddhism and Chinese intellectual history can ill afford to ignore. It will be required reading for all students of Chan/Zen. I would also recommend this book, written clearly and in an engaging style, to nonspecialists who might be interested in the topic. Finally, I must add that this book can fruitfully be read with two other volumes on Song Buddhism: Mark Halperin's Out of the Cloister: Literati Perspectives on Buddhism in Sung China, 960­1279 and Albert Welter's The Linji lu and the Creation of Chan Orthodoxy. Chiew Hui Ho Chiew Hui Ho is a PhD candidate in the Department of Religious Studies at Stanford University. His research focuses on indigenous Buddhist narratives of the Tang period. Haiming Wen. Confucian

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 13, 2009

There are no references for this article.