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Conference on Pure Land Buddhism in Dialogue with Christian Theology

Conference on Pure Land Buddhism in Dialogue with Christian Theology NEWS AND VIEWS James Fredericks Loyola Marymount University As Charlie Parker devotees will attest, improvisation at its most thrilling, if not its most ingenious, is often the result of careful planning. Cannot something similar be said of interreligious dialogue? All our planning and study are best put to use when they suddenly become mere prologue to an encounter that has forced us off the welltrodden path. A dialogue meeting at Loyola Marymount University, September 9­14, 2001, began with much planning and became highly improvisational on September 11th. The roots of this conference go back to discussions between Dennis Hirota and myself in Kyoto in 1998­1999. The two of us are interested in contributing to the future development of Shin Buddhism by placing it in dialogue with Christian theology. The focus here is on Christian theology as one aspect of Christianity's response to the modern world. We are both interested in investigating various theological methods as Christian responses to modernity, and the contributions these methods have made to the reform and renewal of Christian institutions. The ulterior purpose of these investigations is to think in new ways about how a Buddhist "theology" might contribute to the institutional reform and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Conference on Pure Land Buddhism in Dialogue with Christian Theology

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NEWS AND VIEWS James Fredericks Loyola Marymount University As Charlie Parker devotees will attest, improvisation at its most thrilling, if not its most ingenious, is often the result of careful planning. Cannot something similar be said of interreligious dialogue? All our planning and study are best put to use when they suddenly become mere prologue to an encounter that has forced us off the welltrodden path. A dialogue meeting at Loyola Marymount University, September 9­14, 2001, began with much planning and became highly improvisational on September 11th. The roots of this conference go back to discussions between Dennis Hirota and myself in Kyoto in 1998­1999. The two of us are interested in contributing to the future development of Shin Buddhism by placing it in dialogue with Christian theology. The focus here is on Christian theology as one aspect of Christianity's response to the modern world. We are both interested in investigating various theological methods as Christian responses to modernity, and the contributions these methods have made to the reform and renewal of Christian institutions. The ulterior purpose of these investigations is to think in new ways about how a Buddhist "theology" might contribute to the institutional reform and

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 8, 2002

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