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Comparing Eckhartian and Zen Mysticism

Comparing Eckhartian and Zen Mysticism Comparing Eckhartian and Zen1 Mysticism2 Jijimon Alakkalam Joseph Department of Religious Studies, Fu Jen Catholic University Meister Eckhart (ca. 1260­1328?), often referred to as "the man from whom God hid nothing," is one of the great Christian theologians and philosophers of all time. But it is as a mystic that Eckhart is generally known. So any serious study of mysticism, in our times, cannot overlook this Dominican whose birth, childhood, and death remain obscure to this day.3 About the age of eighteen, he probably entered the Dominican order. He was trained at the universities of Cologne and Paris. After completing his higher studies in theology at Paris, twice he was appointed as Paris magister (i.e., lesemeister or master)--in 1302 and in 1311--a rare honor, until then given only to Thomas Aquinas, whose teaching influenced him. After completing his second term as Paris magister, in 1313, he was called to function as the special vicar for the Dominican master general. From 1314 to 1326 Eckhart lived and worked first in Strasburg and then in Cologne, where he served as a spiritual guide for many Dominican nuns, also for Beguines. It was there Eckhart plunged into a life of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Comparing Eckhartian and Zen Mysticism

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Dec 16, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9472
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Abstract

Comparing Eckhartian and Zen1 Mysticism2 Jijimon Alakkalam Joseph Department of Religious Studies, Fu Jen Catholic University Meister Eckhart (ca. 1260­1328?), often referred to as "the man from whom God hid nothing," is one of the great Christian theologians and philosophers of all time. But it is as a mystic that Eckhart is generally known. So any serious study of mysticism, in our times, cannot overlook this Dominican whose birth, childhood, and death remain obscure to this day.3 About the age of eighteen, he probably entered the Dominican order. He was trained at the universities of Cologne and Paris. After completing his higher studies in theology at Paris, twice he was appointed as Paris magister (i.e., lesemeister or master)--in 1302 and in 1311--a rare honor, until then given only to Thomas Aquinas, whose teaching influenced him. After completing his second term as Paris magister, in 1313, he was called to function as the special vicar for the Dominican master general. From 1314 to 1326 Eckhart lived and worked first in Strasburg and then in Cologne, where he served as a spiritual guide for many Dominican nuns, also for Beguines. It was there Eckhart plunged into a life of a

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 16, 2015

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