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Comparative Theology Is Not “Business-as-Usual Theology”: Personal Witness from a Buddhist Christian

Comparative Theology Is Not “Business-as-Usual Theology”: Personal Witness from a Buddhist Christian Paul F. Knitter Union Theological Seminary, Emeritus The following reflections find their stimulus and start in a paper prepared for a doctoral seminar on comparative theology led by John Makransky at Boston College. I was asked whether I was a comparative theologian and, if so, what difference it had made in my professional work as a theologian and in my personal life as a Christian. My basic answer was: "Yes, I think so" and "A lot!" In this reworking and expansion of that seminar paper, I hope to unpack that "a lot." This will enable me not only to carry on the search for clarity (and integrity) that I began in my book Without Buddha I Could Not Be a Christian,1 but also to comment on the promise of comparative theology (CT) and why I fear that this promise all too often goes unfulfilled. What I'm getting at is capsulized in a blurb that John Thatamanil wrote for Michelle Voss Roberts's Dualities: A Theology of Difference: 2 "Comparative theology done well is a dangerous discipline precisely because it raises provocative questions and threatens to put an end to business-as-usual theology." I fear that some comparative theologians are not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Comparative Theology Is Not “Business-as-Usual Theology”: Personal Witness from a Buddhist Christian

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Dec 16, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

Paul F. Knitter Union Theological Seminary, Emeritus The following reflections find their stimulus and start in a paper prepared for a doctoral seminar on comparative theology led by John Makransky at Boston College. I was asked whether I was a comparative theologian and, if so, what difference it had made in my professional work as a theologian and in my personal life as a Christian. My basic answer was: "Yes, I think so" and "A lot!" In this reworking and expansion of that seminar paper, I hope to unpack that "a lot." This will enable me not only to carry on the search for clarity (and integrity) that I began in my book Without Buddha I Could Not Be a Christian,1 but also to comment on the promise of comparative theology (CT) and why I fear that this promise all too often goes unfulfilled. What I'm getting at is capsulized in a blurb that John Thatamanil wrote for Michelle Voss Roberts's Dualities: A Theology of Difference: 2 "Comparative theology done well is a dangerous discipline precisely because it raises provocative questions and threatens to put an end to business-as-usual theology." I fear that some comparative theologians are not

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 16, 2015

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