Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Community of “Neighbors”: A Baptist-Buddhist Reflects on the Common Ground of Love

Community of “Neighbors”: A Baptist-Buddhist Reflects on the Common Ground of Love Jan Willis Wesleyan University Today we are all aware that the concept of "race" is a mere construction. There is only one "race": the human race; to think otherwise is like still believing that the earth is flat. But "racism" is a different matter. It exists as a system of beliefs and prejudices that people differ along biological and genetic lines and that one's own group is superior to another group. When these beliefs and prejudices are coupled with power-- especially the power to negatively affect the lives of those perceived to be inferior-- we have a serious problem. And no one should downplay or underestimate the harm that such an ideology inflicts upon everyone who participates in it. According to one African American professor of social work, "America's history is inextricably bound to this racist ideology. From the codifying of slavery, to the belief in `Manifest Destiny,' to the treatment of `illegal immigrants,' many of America's actions continue to conflict with its creed that `All men are created equal.'"1 Over the past decade or so, I have written a number of pieces that focus upon racism in America and racism in so-called American Buddhism.2 Being African American http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Community of “Neighbors”: A Baptist-Buddhist Reflects on the Common Ground of Love

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 34 (1) – Feb 3, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/community-of-neighbors-a-baptist-buddhist-reflects-on-the-common-sY7Q3S7jXn
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jan Willis Wesleyan University Today we are all aware that the concept of "race" is a mere construction. There is only one "race": the human race; to think otherwise is like still believing that the earth is flat. But "racism" is a different matter. It exists as a system of beliefs and prejudices that people differ along biological and genetic lines and that one's own group is superior to another group. When these beliefs and prejudices are coupled with power-- especially the power to negatively affect the lives of those perceived to be inferior-- we have a serious problem. And no one should downplay or underestimate the harm that such an ideology inflicts upon everyone who participates in it. According to one African American professor of social work, "America's history is inextricably bound to this racist ideology. From the codifying of slavery, to the belief in `Manifest Destiny,' to the treatment of `illegal immigrants,' many of America's actions continue to conflict with its creed that `All men are created equal.'"1 Over the past decade or so, I have written a number of pieces that focus upon racism in America and racism in so-called American Buddhism.2 Being African American

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 3, 2014

There are no references for this article.