Coming Full Circle: A Conversation with Nguyen Duy

Coming Full Circle: A Conversation with Nguyen Duy N G U Y E N B A C H U N G Nguyen Duy was born in 1946 in the village of Dong Ve i nT h a n hH oa Province. He joined the local militia forces defending Ham Rong Bridge in 1963. From 1965 to 1975, he served as a signal soldier responsible for laying down communication lines for the field command in the South, where he covered and fought in most of the major campaigns, including those in Khe Sanh, Quang Tri, and Laos. As a response to the hardship and suffering at the front, he began writing poetry, and as his work came to be known, his poems were read over the radio. After the war, he settled in Ho Chi Minh City, where he became the southern editor for the literary journal Van Nghe. Duy's settlement in the south was an important event that marked the creation of a milieu in which artists, writers, and musicians from north and south--including pavn, nlf, and perhaps even arv n forces--might support each other in creating new forums for the arts. Duy's heartfelt rendering of the hardships of country life as well as his critiques http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Coming Full Circle: A Conversation with Nguyen Duy

Manoa, Volume 14 (1) – Apr 1, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
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Abstract

N G U Y E N B A C H U N G Nguyen Duy was born in 1946 in the village of Dong Ve i nT h a n hH oa Province. He joined the local militia forces defending Ham Rong Bridge in 1963. From 1965 to 1975, he served as a signal soldier responsible for laying down communication lines for the field command in the South, where he covered and fought in most of the major campaigns, including those in Khe Sanh, Quang Tri, and Laos. As a response to the hardship and suffering at the front, he began writing poetry, and as his work came to be known, his poems were read over the radio. After the war, he settled in Ho Chi Minh City, where he became the southern editor for the literary journal Van Nghe. Duy's settlement in the south was an important event that marked the creation of a milieu in which artists, writers, and musicians from north and south--including pavn, nlf, and perhaps even arv n forces--might support each other in creating new forums for the arts. Duy's heartfelt rendering of the hardships of country life as well as his critiques

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 1, 2002

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